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Vacation Time and Pay for Employees

Vacation time earned by employees varies by the length of time that they have worked with their employer. The BLS reports: Workers with one year of experience average 11 days of paid vacation. Employees with five years of experience average 15 days of vacation. Workers with 10 and 20 years of tenure average 17 and 20 days respectively.

"How much vacation time do employees get?" The answer is that it depends on the company or organization you're employed by. There isn't a set amount, because employers are not required to provide vacation leave either with pay or unpaid.

Some employers give vacation time to only full-time employees. Others grant vacation time to all employees. Still, others offer pro-rated vacation, depending on your work schedule and employment status.

Federal law does not provide for vacation pay. The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) does not require payment for time not worked, such as vacations, sick time, or holidays. Therefore, employees are not legally entitled to paid vacation time or paid holidays off from work.

Vacation pay is based upon an agreement between an employer and an employee, either a collective bargaining agreement, company policy, or employment contract. The agreement or company policy will determine how much vacation pay you will get if you are entitled to receive it.

The amount of vacation time any employee receives is determined by company policy, collective bargaining agreements, or even, especially in small companies, an informal agreement between an employee and management.

There are some rules that apply, however. When employers do offer vacation, it has to be offered equitably. So, companies can't discriminate based on race, gender, religion, or other protected characteristics when giving time off from work.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), 73 percent of workers in private industry are provided with paid vacation days. More than three-quarters of workers in sales and office jobs (80 percent), production, transportation, and material moving jobs (80 percent), natural resources, construction, and maintenance jobs (79 percent), and management, professional, and related jobs (76 percent) had access to paid vacation time. Just over half of workers in service occupations (55 percent) had access to paid vacation leave.

Vacation time earned by employees varies by the length of time that they have worked with their employer. The BLS reports:

  • Workers with one year of experience average 11 days of paid vacation.
  • Employees with five years of experience average 15 days of vacation.
  • Workers with 10 and 20 years of tenure average 17 and 20 days respectively.

The 2017 Paid Leave in the Workplace survey from the International Foundation of Employee Benefits reports that Paid Time Off (PTO) plans, which would include days off that can be used for a variety of reasons, offer salaried employees 17 days after one year of service, 22 days after five years, 25 days after ten years, and 28 days after 20 years of employment. The survey reports that salary employees receive an average of 12 days of vacation after one year of service, 16 days after five years, 19 days after ten years, and 23 days after 20 years of employment.

The United States lagged behind many other countries in the developed world both in the average vacation time accrued and in the number of vacation days workers actually took according to a survey conducted by Expedia. European countries, Japan, India, Australia, and New Zealand generally averaged 20 - 30 days of paid vacation, while the overall average for the United States was 15 days.

Many employers now lump together vacation time with personal days and sick time to provide a total number of days of paid time off (PTO) from work. This bank of time typically does not include federal holidays which, depending on the employer's holiday policy, would be additional days off from work. Employees who experience significant or repeated illnesses or family emergencies requiring time away from work may end up with less (or no) vacation time during those years. On the other hand, healthy workers with no personal issues may be able to take more vacation time.

ProjectManager.com's 2018 Paid Time Off Study white paper reports that the average PTO reported by surveyed U.S. employees is three weeks. 27 percent of employees have one week or less, or none at all. 3.4 percent of surveyed workers have unlimited paid time off. Government workers have the highest accrued time off, averaging 4.2 weeks. Managers earned 19% more PTO than regular employees.

Company policy determines how employees earn vacation time. Some companies provide PTO that accrues on a monthly basis or is based on a certain number of hours worked. For example, employees may receive one day per month or 8 hours of leave that they can take off for any reason.

Other companies provide vacation based on years of service. In this case, the employee could be provided with a week for every year of service, up to a maximum number of weeks. If vacation is based on years of service, the employee is usually eligible to take it after they have worked for a year.

Again, the amount earned depends on company policy or the terms of a collective bargaining agreement for covered workers.

Depending on company policy, employees may be required to use their vacation during a specific time period, which is known as "use it or lose it," or they may be able to carry unused vacation or PTO over to future years.

If the company does allow vacation to be accrued there may be limits to how much time can be carried over, and there may be a deadline for using the carried over vacation days.

Recent surveys indicate that employees are struggling to use their allotted vacation time. Given the demands of their jobs, almost half of workers reported that they didn't take the time to which they were entitled.

When a company is offering you a job, they should let you know how much vacation you are entitled to and when you can start taking it. If you haven't been informed, check with the Human Resources department or with the person who offered you the job. That way, you will know upfront what time you will be able to take off from work.

If you're already working, check with Human Resources (the information may also be available on the company website) for clarification of your vacation status.

If the company doesn't offer vacation time, you may be able to negotiate with your employer to take a certain number of days off. This would most likely be unpaid time off from work. 

In addition, if you do receive paid vacation, you may be able to negotiate extra time off, on an unpaid basis, if your employer is flexible.

There are no guarantees, of course, but sometimes it can't hurt to put in a request if you are a well-respected employee.

Experienced workers who are being recruited might be able to negotiate additional vacation time to equal the amount of vacation offered by their current employer (instead of accepting the amount of vacation traditionally awarded to new hires at their target firm). 

There are no federal laws regulating vacation, however, depending on the state in which you reside, vacation is considered compensation, and employees must be allowed to accrue vacation or be paid for unused vacation time.

buddypunch.com

28-09-2021 · 2080 hours – 40 hours (Allocated PTO) = 2,040 hours. 2,040 hours – 40 hours (5 paid vacation days off = 40 hours) = 2,000 hours per year. Now to get the accrual multiplier, divide the number of allocated vacation hours by the total hours per year as calculated above.

28-09-2021

As a business owner, you are not legally required to provide paid time off to your employees, but paid vacation boosts employee morale and satisfaction with the company. Happy employees tend to be the best employees, so making room for vacation pay ends up being a worthy sacrifice even for small businesses.

That said, calculating PTO (Paid Time Off) can be a confusing task for some employers. It all depends on which “accrual rate” you decide to use. The first step to track employee vacation time is to decide how many hours you want to allocate to full-time employees each year. Based on a 40-hour work week, you may want to give 40 hours (1 week of vacation time), 80 hours (2 weeks), or some other number in between. Based on the accrual method you choose, you can calculate how much time employees accrue each pay period.

Common PTO Accrual Methods

Below are some of the most common accrual methods, complete with explanations of how to calculate PTO based on each method, as well as how to track vacation time for employees.

Yearly

The simplest way to award vacation time is in a lump sum yearly. Choose a time when your employees accrue their allotted vacation time – usually at the beginning of the year or on the employee’s anniversary date.  At the beginning of the year, add their vacation time. As the employee takes time off, simply subtract it from the current total. The main downside to this accrual rate is new employees have to wait a full calendar year before accruing any amount of vacation time. If you do not want them to wait, one of the other accrual rates may work better for you.

Hourly

This accrual rate is ideal for part-time employees who work variables shifts and are used to sick time. Their allocated time off is directly dependent on the number of hours they worked.

Calculation Example:

For the sake of an example, we will use the most common 40 hour work week.  To figure out how many hours your employee works in a year, multiply 4o hours by 52 weeks (the number of weeks in a year.) Then subtract the 40 hours off (or other amount of PTO.)

40 hours (Hours in 1 work week) x 52 weeks = 2,080 hours

2080 hours – 40 hours (Allocated PTO) = 2,040 hours

2,040 hours – 40 hours (5 paid vacation days off = 40 hours) = 2,000 hours per year

Now to get the accrual multiplier, divide the number of allocated vacation hours by the total hours per year as calculated above.

40 hours (Hours in 1 work week) ÷ 2,000 yearly hours worked = .02 hours

This means that for every hour your employee works, they will earn .02 hours of PTO.

 Daily

The daily accrual rate is another rate that is ideal for part-time employees. The only requirement is that the part-time employees work full eight-hour shifts. If the employees only work partial shifts or varying shifts, it may be better to choose a different accrual method.

 Calculation Example: 

You will first need to multiply the number of work days in a week by 52 weeks to calculate how many work days you have per year (remember to subtract any paid holidays and the days off per year).

5 (Days in a work week) x 52 (Weeks in a year) = 260 work days a year

260 – 5 (Allocated PTO) = 255 days

255 – 5 (Paid holidays) = 250 work days per year

Now to get the accrual multiplier, divide the number of allocated vacation days by the total work days per year as calculated above.

5 ÷ 250 (Work days per year) = .02 days

This means that for every day your employee works, they will earn .02 days of PTO.

Alternative Vacation Accrual Methods

Monthly, Twice a Month, or Every Two Weeks

After the yearly accrual method, these are the more common, simpler accrual methods used to calculate PTO.  Employees tend to be less confused because they will see the same amount on each paycheck.

 Calculation Example: 

You would take the number of yearly allocated PTO hours and divide it by 12 for monthly pay, by 24 for twice-monthly pay, or 26 for bi-weekly pay.

40 (Allocated PTO) ÷ 12 = 3.33 hours accrued per pay period

or

40 (Allocated PTO) ÷ 24 = 1.67 hours accrued per pay period

or

40 (Allocated PTO) ÷ 26 = 1.54 hours accrued per pay period

Whichever method (or variation of methods) you choose to use to calculate PTO for your employees, write it down. Make it policy. It avoids confusion and accusations of favoritism.

Planning for “Next Year”

While it’s normally difficult to make any drastic changes to your operations, it’s important to take time at the end of the year to consider what new innovations and techniques you can adopt going into the next year – including how you handle your PTO policy.

Taking the time to survey your employees and gauge how they’re feeling about their PTO can be a great help. Have there been complaints to the Human Resources department? Do they feel they’re lacking sick leave? What could you do to increase the satisfaction your valued, salaried employees have with your business?

Consider experimenting with different methods of PTO – either in practice or in theory – to see how they respond. As we mentioned earlier, increasing your employee’s job satisfaction could pay off in dividends if it results in greater productivity and an enthusiastic workforce.

It would also be beneficial for you to invest in a time tracking software that includes a PTO calculator. It can get tricky deciding between the functions of the software itself vs any built-in accrual calculator, so make sure to review your options to determine the best overall fit for your business. Our advice would be to narrow your selection to only include software with free trials so that you can directly test out how well they fit your operations.

en.wikipedia.org

16-12-2021 · Summer vacation for middle school and high school students starts on June 21 and ends on August 31 (two months and 10 days). Summer vacation for primary school students starts on July 1 and ends on August 31 (two months). Italy. In Italy, summer vacation for elementary, middle and high schools normally starts the second week of June and lasts until the second week of September included, for a ...

16-12-2021
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School break

Summer vacation or summer break is a school break in summer between school years and the break in the school academic year. Students are typically off between eight and nine weeks. Depending on the country and district, staff might be partially or fully excluded.

In the United States, summer break is approximately three and a half months, with students typically finishing the school year between late-May and late-June and starting the new year between early-August and early-September. In Spain, Portugal, Republic of Ireland, Italy, Greece, Georgia, Lithuania, Latvia, Lebanon, Romania and Russia, the summer break is normally three months, compared to three to six weeks (sometimes 2 months) in Australia, Brazil, the United Kingdom, Pakistan, Bangladesh, India, Denmark, the Netherlands, Slovakia and Germany.

Criticisms and support

The research around the impact of summer vacation is mixed.[1] “Summer learning loss” (or “summer slide”)[2] is the perceived loss of learning students experience due to interrupted education, but the exact consequences of extended breaks is unclear. Advocates of breaks tend to focus on the need to give children time away from the childhood stresses sometimes associated with school including peer pressure, cliques, bullying, and the pressure of heavy loads of homework.

By country

Argentina

In Argentina, the school year ends in early- or mid-December and starts late February or early March. Also the majority of students get two weeks of holidays during winter, which varies depending on the region of the country from late July or mid-July to early August.

  • Primary education: From mid-December to late February (2 months)
  • Secondary education: From early December to early March (3 months)
  • University education: From last day of December (31 December) to early April

Australia

In Australia, summer officially lasts from 1 December to 28 February, and therefore includes traditional holidays such as Hanukkah, Christmas and New Year. The dates of Australian school holidays are determined by each state's education department. Typically summer holidays in Australia last approximately six weeks, usually from mid December (depending on school level) to late January. This is significantly shorter than North American summer holiday, but Australian schools also break for 2 weeks in April and in June and September, giving students and teachers a total of twelve weeks of annual holidays. In many public schools, years 10, 11 and 12 will finish before December 15, allowing time to complete exam marking and results. Year 10 commonly finishes at the end of November, Year 11 at the end of October, and year 12 (Senior Year) also at mid or the end of October after 3 weeks of end-of-year exams. This can bring the normal 12 weeks of vacation to 20 weeks of vacation.

The intervening periods of school operation without holidays are called "school terms", each term lasting approximately ten weeks. All Australian states have relatively similar holiday periods between each term, but there is the ability for this to change, as it did in the Melbourne 2006 Commonwealth Games, when the first term in Victorian schools was shortened to six weeks and the other subsequently extended to 12 weeks due to severe disruptions to the public and private bus networks used by school students. Most private schools in Australia have up to four weeks of additional holidays, due to their longer teaching hours during term.

Austria

In Austria, summer vacation dates vary by region, however the break lasts nine weeks throughout the whole country. School usually ends in early July and starts in early September.

Bangladesh

In Bangladesh, summer vacation begins in mid-May and ends in mid-June (4 weeks). Also, in many schools, the holiday during the month of Ramadan (Around mid-May to around mid-April) is passed off as a summer vacation. The summer there is associated with the availability of fruits such as mangoes (আম / aam) and jackfruits (কাঠাল / kaathaal). So, the summer vacation is sometimes known in Bangladesh as "আম-কাঠালের ছুটি", (pronounced as aam-kaathaaler chhuti), which roughly translates to "mango-jackfruit's holiday". Also, the summer vacation is sometimes not in line with the actual weather patterns during summer, resulting in students having to reach school in the heat. The summer vacations are not given much importance in places except schools.

Barbados

In Barbados, summer holiday dates have varied throughout the years due to the beginning of the hurricane season on June 1. Because of this, major storms affecting the island can cause schools to remain closed for days resulting in a pushback of vacation dates, for example with Hurricane Tomas in 2010. Currently, summer holiday begins in late June or early July and ends in the second week of September.

Belgium

In Belgium, summer vacation lasts in general from July 1 until September 1 (2 months).

Bolivia

In Bolivia, summer vacation runs from early December to early February[3] (2 months).

Bosnia and Herzegovina

In Bosnia and Herzegovina, the start of summer break varies by school, but usually starts at the beginning or mid-June. School starts on the first Monday of September.

Brazil

In Brazil, summer holidays vary by region, state and school administration.

The education system in Brazil is federalised, with Federal, State and Municipal schools, all of which can establish their own calendars, alongside that, every federal entity may maintain schools on any of the educational levels, meaning that even in the same town a Municipal-maintained High School, a State-maintained High School, and a privately owned High School have differing calendars, resulting in summer holidays not being simultaneous throughout the country or even town.

The Federal Education Law (Lei de Diretrizes e Bases da Educação Nacional) determines that both Primary and Secondary Education shall consist of a minimum of 800 hours a year, distributed between a minimum of 200 school days, allowing schools to plan for school years that extend beyond the mandatory minimum.

In terms of dates, summer holidays might last between 45 and 60 days; from late November — early December, to late January — early February.

In addition, for the majority of Brazilian students there are two to four weeks off for winter in July; the winter holidays were held in August for 2016 only due to the 2016 Summer Olympics.

Bulgaria

In Bulgaria, the time of the break differs according to the grade of the students. The following periods are applied:

1st-3rd grade: May 31 – September 15

4th-6th grade: June 15 – September 15

7th-11th grade: June 30 – September 15

12th grade: School year ends in mid-May.

Note that 8th grade classes that focus on intensive language learning's summer vacation also starts on 30 June, rather than the 15th.[4]

Canada

In Canada, the first day of summer vacation for public schools is the last Saturday in June. However, in some provinces students get a Professional Activity day on the final Friday of that school week, and their last day would be on the Thursday. Depending on the province, students can get 2–3 months of summer vacation. This may vary in Quebec (earlier due to provincial June 24 holiday). The last day of summer vacation is Labour Day. This can vary in Private schools. School generally resumes the day after Labour Day (in September).

Chile

In Chile, summer vacation lasts from early or mid-December until late February or early March (11, 11 or 12 weeks).

China

In the People's Republic of China, summer holidays start in early July and often end in early September (2 months).

Colombia

In Colombia, summer vacation varies. Because of Colombia's equatorial climate (see Climate of Colombia), schools run two different calendars. Public schools and some private schools run "Calendar A" which has a break between June and July. Only some private schools run "Calendar B" in which there is a long vacation in July and August.

Costa Rica

In Costa Rica, summer vacation lasts 2 months. Usually begin in late December and end in early February. There are a few schools using the "American" style, those school usually take vacations in late May and then resume again in early August.

Croatia

In Croatia, the school year finishes around 20 June and it usually starts on the first Monday of September, but if the first Monday is on 1st or 2 September, the school year will start on the second Monday.

Czech Republic

In the Czech Republic, summer holiday begins on July 1 and ends on August 31 (2 months).[5]

Denmark

In Denmark, summer break lasts from the end of June to early or mid-August (6 weeks). High schools (colleges) usually return to school in early August, but for younger students it can be in the middle.

Ecuador

In Ecuador, summer vacation varies. Because of Ecuador's equatorial climate (see Climate of Ecuador for more information), schools run two different calendars. The coastal region runs vacation January or February, but in the Sierra region, summer vacation follows the pattern in July and August.

Egypt

In Egypt, summer break lasts from the beginning or the middle of June until the middle of September (3 months / 14 weeks) in public schools, though length slightly differs according to age. In most private schools, summer break lasts from the middle or end of June to the beginning of September (2.5 months / 10 weeks)

Estonia

In Estonia, summer holidays start in the beginning of June, the date ranging for different grades. School begins every year on September 1.

Ethiopia

In Ethiopia, the school year usually ends in late May to mid-June and begins in mid-September (8 to 12 weeks).

Finland

In Finland, summer vacation starts on Saturday (in week 22) in late May or in the beginning of June. The vacation lasts for 2 to 212 months. Usually, school starts again on a date between August 7 to 18.

France

In France, summer vacation usually consists of July and August (2 months), though secondary school students finish in mid-June due to the senior's exams. This may vary for private schools.

Germany

In Germany, summer vacation lasts six to six and a half weeks. The exact dates vary by state as well as from one to the next year, from the earliest (mid-June to late July) to the latest (late July to early September). In Germany, the annual holidays are split into winter holidays (about one week), Easter holidays (mostly about two weeks), summer holiday (about six and a half weeks), autumn holidays (about one to two weeks) and Christmas holidays (about one to two weeks). Some states like Bavaria also have holidays for Pentecost.

Greece

In Greece, the summer vacation lasts for 3 months. Schools close on June 15 and reopen on September 11. Universities generally close in mid-July, but with great differences between faculties.

Guatemala

In Guatemala, the summer holidays start in middle October and end in early January (approx 12 weeks).

Guyana

In Guyana, the summer holidays start in early July and end in early September (2 months).

Hungary

In Hungary, summer vacation usually lasts from mid-June (15th) to early September (the first workday). This is about 11 or 12 weeks.

Hong Kong

In Hong Kong, summer vacation normally begins in mid-July and ends on late August (6–7 weeks) for most public schools. However, the starting and ending times of international schools are variable. For example, most ESF-based schools start in late June and finish mid-August (7 weeks).

Iceland

In Iceland, the duration of the summer vacation can vary from one school to another. Typically students start their summer vacation during the first week of June and return to school in the fourth week of August.[6]

India

India covers a wide spectrum of climates, resulting in a large variation in the start times and duration of summer vacation in different regions of the country.

In northern India, summer vacation typically begins in mid-May and ends by early July. The exceptions are the Himalayan Jammu & Kashmir, Uttarakhand, and Himachal Pradesh, where the summer break is short, and the winter break is much longer. For example, in Jammu & Kashmir, summer vacation is only for ten days, with a long winter break from mid-December to the end of February instead.

In central India, summer vacation begins in mid-April, and schools re-open in mid-June.

In the south, schools finish in the last week of March or early April and resume in early-to-mid June.

In the north-eastern states, a new school year commences before the holidays, in April. A few weeks later, schools finish for summer vacation between May and June, during the hottest months of the year.

Indian schools have the following holidays: Diwali- (1 week/2 days), Dusshera- (2 weeks), Christmas- (2 weeks/2 days), Makara Sankranti- (4 days/1 week) and Summer- (6-9 and a half weeks).

Iran

In Iran, summer vacation lasts three months. Schools close in mid June and reopen in late September. However, most private high schools make it mandatory for students to attend school for around 2 months during summer. This means students end up having a 2-week break after finals, and another 2-week break before school starts again in late September.

Iraq

In Iraq, summer vacation begins in late May and ends in late September, but the 12th-grade vacation begins in late June and ends in mid-October, and 9th grade starts from mid-June to September.

Ireland

In the Republic of Ireland, most secondary schools start summer holidays at the end of May or the start of June. However, Junior and Leaving Certificate exams will take place during June. Schools will usually open again at the end of August to the start of September. Primary schools in the Republic of Ireland are sixteen days longer, so they start their summer holiday at the end of June but do not return until the first week of September.[7]Private schools follow the same pattern.

Israel

Summer vacation for middle school and high school students starts on June 21 and ends on August 31 (two months and 10 days). Summer vacation for primary school students starts on July 1 and ends on August 31 (two months).

Italy

In Italy, summer vacation for elementary, middle and high schools normally starts the second week of June and lasts until the second week of September included, for a total of about three months. For kindergartens, summer vacation starts at the end of June and lasts until the first week of September. Final term examinations for middle school and high school are held until the end of June or the first days of July. Usually, also shops and factories are closed (or with reduced productivity) in the week surrounding August 15th - Ferragosto (both religious and secular holiday).

Jamaica

In Jamaica, summer holidays for primary and secondary schools starts in the first week of July and ends in the first week of September which gives a duration of about eight weeks. Tertiary institutions using the semester system typically have summer holidays starting in May (at the end of examinations) and ending in early September. This can, however, vary among institutions.

Japan

In Japan, the summer vacation generally lasts from late July to early September, and due to the way education in Japan is structured, it takes place within a school year.

Jordan

In Jordan, summer vacation lasts 3 months, and most schools take summer vacation from mid-June to mid-September.

Kuwait

In Kuwait, summer vacation for elementary and middle schools [1st to 9th grade] starts at the end of May or at the beginning of June and ends at the beginning to late September, sometimes as far as early October (public schools). For high school students [10th to 12th grade], it starts on June 19–20 and ends at the same time as elementary and middle schools.

Latvia

In Latvia, summer vacation lasts 3 months. Starting on 1 June and ending on 31 August, with the new school year starting the next day.

Lebanon

In Lebanon, summer vacation lasts almost 3 months and most schools take summer vacation from mid-June to early-to-mid September.

Libya

In Libya, summer break lasts from the beginning or the middle of June until the middle of September (3 Months – 14 Weeks). There are 5 other smaller vacations: Mid-year two-week break around February and two Hijri lunar calendar 3-day religious breaks for Eid Fitr (15 June in 2018) and Eid Adha (22 Aug in 2018).

Lithuania

In Lithuania, summer vacation starts in 15th learning day of June (ex. June 21) and ends on September 1 with the start of a new school year (2.5 months).

Luxembourg

In Luxembourg, summer vacation starts on July 16 and ends on September 15, lasting a total of two months. There are 5 other smaller vacations: All Saints' Day (1 week), Christmas (2 weeks), Carnival (1 week), Easter (2 weeks), Pentecost (1 week). (See also holidays in Luxembourg)

North Macedonia

In North Macedonia, the summer vacation starts on June 10 and ends on September 1 in every school. They also get Christmas vacations from 31 December until 21 January, and 1 week break for Easter.

Malta

In Malta, the summer holidays usually last from the end of June until the end of September (3 months).

Moldova

In Moldova, summer vacation begins on 1 June and ends on 1 September (3 months).

Morocco

In Morocco, summer vacation lasts from June 20 until the beginning of September (2 months).

Mexico

In Mexico, summer vacation starts in early July and finishes in mid-August since 2000. However, high school students (10th–12th grades) and college students have mostly two months of vacation: from late May or early June to early August.

Mongolia

In Mongolia, summer vacation usually starts from late May or early June (varies between schools) to the end of August. The school year is divided into 4 terms (lasting 8 to 9 weeks each), and students take 1 week off after the first and second terms, and 2 weeks after the third term.

Nepal

In Nepal, summer vacation runs from the end of May to the end of July.

Netherlands

In the Netherlands, summer vacation is about 6 weeks for primary school and high school, usually from mid-July to late August. School students officially get the same time off but there often is a one-week period before the vacation during which the student will only have to go to school for 2 days to receive their grade lists and bring back their books, making the holiday 7 weeks unofficially for high school students. However, this does not apply to every school.

New Zealand

In New Zealand, the school holidays typically start in early to mid-December, and end in late January or early February, which is usually 6–8 weeks.[8] Senior secondary school students in Years 11, 12 and 13 finish in late-October for study leave, and their summer holidays begin after their last exam, which is different depending on the subjects they take. All exams are over by late November or early December. University or polytech students do not start until mid-February or early March and finish in late-October or mid-November.

Nigeria

In Nigeria, primary and secondary Schools usually start summer vacation in mid-July and resume in the early weeks of September. The vacation is also known as the "3rd-term holiday", and it is the longest break in a school year (typically up to two months). The "first-term break" starts between one and two weeks prior to Christmas and ends the first or second week in January, lasting for about three weeks. The "first-term break" is usually the shortest break in a school year. The "second-term break" usually starts a week before Easter and lasts for another three weeks. This gives a total of about 14 weeks of holiday in a year. The geographical location of the school is also a factor.

Tertiary institutions follow a different pattern, as the holiday in each school depends on various factors which include, the course of study and the academic calendar of the school. Some tertiary institutions observe their summer breaks in the normal summer period when elementary and high schools observe theirs, while others do not. Some courses of study also do not observe any significant holidays, such programmes include engineering, nursing, medicine and a few others. This is usually as a result of students doing their laboratory work, workshop practice, practicals, internship etc. (as the case may be), while the other students in other programmes are on holiday. Tertiary schools observe two semesters; while some schools observe a break after the first semester, many others have their breaks combined to just the summer holidays. This long break helps the students get good jobs during the holiday. The total length of break observed in tertiary institutions in a year is 12 to 14 weeks.

Norway

In Norway, summer vacation typically lasts from mid June to mid August, for a minimum of 8 weeks.

Oman

In Oman, summer vacation starts in late May and ends in early September (3 months).

Pakistan

In Pakistan, Summer vacation lasts for two to three months depending on the type of school (public or private). Typical summer vacation is from the end of May to mid-August.[9] Many private schools are also open in June and July for 8th to 10th grades, with the schools calling the summer programmes "summer camps". However, it is a controversial issue between public and private schools.

Panama

In Panama, summer vacation starts in early December for both public or private schools, and ends in late February (3 months).

Paraguay

In Paraguay, summer holidays start in December and end in late February (2 months).

Philippines

In the Philippines, summer holidays for kindergarten, elementary, and high schools typically start on the third week of March and end in the first to third week of June. This coincides with the country's tropical dry season months from March to June. Colleges and universities, however, offer summer classes for students who wants to take advanced subjects or those who fail to pass the prerequisites for the next school year. School year begins in the first week of June, the start of Philippines' wet season.

Select universities have adapted the school year schedule of other countries, starting the school year in September and having the summer holidays from June to August.[10][11] Some of the schools that complied are still in transition, their academic calendars still beginning in July, others in August, with their summer vacations adjusted accordingly.[12]

Poland

In Poland, summer vacation starts on the first Friday after June 20 and ends on the first weekday of September except Friday or Saturday.

Portugal

In Portugal, summer vacation starts in mid-June, and finishes in the middle of September. Some students, thought, have exams which are usually in the end of June (the first stage) and in July (the second stage, for the students that are willing to improve their marks).

Russia

In Russia, summer vacation starts on May 25 with the end of an old school year (for 1st–8th and 10th grades) and ends on September 1 with the beginning of a new school year. For 9th and 11th grades, due to exams (EGE), the vacation starts in the middle (9th grade) or in the end (11th grade) of June.

Romania

In Romania, summer vacation usually starts on June 14 and ends on the second Sunday in September (3 months). For 8th grade, it starts a week earlier than the official summer vacation date for the year, and two weeks earlier for 12th grade.[2]

Saint Lucia

In Saint Lucia, summer vacation starts in early July and ends on the first Monday of September (8 weeks).

Saudi Arabia

The summer break for Saudi Arabian students is generally Mid-May until end of august, depending on the timing of Ramadan.

Serbia

In Serbia, the summer vacation starts around the ending of June, more precisely by the end of 2nd or 3rd week of June. Summer holiday ends on August 31. School officially starts on first working day of September (if September 1 is on Saturday or Sunday, starting of school is delayed until Monday).

Slovakia

In Slovakia, summer break lasts from July 1 until September 1 (2 months and Constitution Day).[13]

Slovenia

In Slovenia, final exams are usually taken from mid-May to mid-June (high schools) or in June (primary schools). The last day of school is June 24, and school resumes on September 1.

South Africa

In South Africa, summer holidays usually begin in early December and end in early to mid-January. Winter break lasts from mid-June to early July, and there are 10 days of Easter holidays.

South Korea

In South Korea, summer vacation starts in mid-July and ends in mid-August or late August. The South Korean summer vacation takes place within a school year.

South Sudan

In South Sudan, summer vacation starts on December 20 and ends on March 19.

Spain

In Spain, the school year finishes in mid or late June and begins in mid-September. Vacation varies by region but often includes a family vacation to lower temperatures in the cooler regions in the north of Spain, or south or east to the Mediterranean beaches.[14]

Suriname

In Suriname, summer vacation usually starts in mid-August and ends in early-October.[15] In 2012, a change of summer vacation was proposed by several legislators having summer vacation the same time as the Caribbean Community.[15] The proposed plan is summer vacation starts from mid-August and ends in early-October.[15]

Sweden

In Sweden, summer vacation is between the spring and autumn term. Normally it lasts for around 10 weeks, starting from the week before midsummer and ending in mid-August (normally the 8th week after midsummer). In Sweden, students end their term, either at a church or in their school, singing traditional summer songs like Den blomstertid nu kommer (normally only the first two verses).

Switzerland

In Switzerland, summer vacation varies in each canton. As an example, in Zürich, it lasts five weeks and between mid-July and mid-August.[16] In Ticino, it lasts about ten weeks between late June and early September.[17]

Syria

In Syria, summer vacation lasts 3 months. It starts mid-June (for primary and secondary schools) and ends mid-September. University students have a vacation from early July to early October. This varies 2 or 3 days by school or year. The mid-term holiday is usually a week long.

Taiwan

In Taiwan, summer vacation starts in early July (late June for university students) and ends in late August (mid-September for university students).

Thailand

In Thailand, summer vacation begins in late February to early March and ends in mid-May.

Trinidad and Tobago

Primary and secondary schools close the first Friday of July and open on the first Monday of September (giving students two months). This can vary a day or two by school or year. International schools are in link with the British, Canadian, or American systems.

Turkey

In Turkey, summer vacation starts in mid-June and ends in mid-September (3 months).

Tunisia

In Tunisia, summer vacation for the middle school (7th–9th grade) and high school starts on May 30 and ends on September 15. Primary schools are off to vacation on June 1 and end on September 15.

United Arab Emirates

The summer vacation begins formally towards the beginning of July. All schools in the UAE are closed in July and August. All public and private sectors and schools enjoy two days weekend on Fridays and Saturdays. The Knowledge and Human Development Authority (KHDA) also releases holiday updates for private schools in Dubai. Students will be getting a seven-week break during summer, a three-week break during winter, and a two-week break for spring.

United Kingdom

In England and Wales, summer holidays for state schools usually last from late July through to early September, which gives a duration of six or seven weeks.

In Scotland, school summer holidays start in late June and last for about six or seven weeks, with most schools returning around mid-August. However, it is not uncommon for some schools in recent years to finish on the first week of July.

In Northern Ireland, most school summer holidays start in late-June and runs through to the beginning of September. Students doing exams (GCSEs and A-Levels) often get "study leave" from May and do the exams sometime in that month, or early-June.

In the United Kingdom, holiday dates for independent schools mostly differ from those of state schools; these differences typically take the form of an extra week's holiday at the beginning and end of each of the long holidays, meaning four weeks for the Christmas and Easter breaks and eight to ten weeks for the summer break, though variations in summer holidays length exist between independent schools themselves. The summer half-term break is determined by the break in public exams at the end of May. Some universities grant an extended "exam leave" to students which typically commences in early-April, so as to give students a good number of weeks to prepare for the summer exam season which usually starts in mid-to-late May and finishes in early or mid-June. Final year students at independent schools typically finish their time at school when their last exam in the summer exam season finishes, and as an encore; a special event is usually arranged for late-June by the school for leavers and staff as a way of providing an opportunity for final farewells to be bid. The universities they go on to typically schedule their first term to commence in early-October, giving school leavers an extended summer break between their time of leaving school and starting university.

United States

The dates vary depending on the location of the school district but generally follow the same schedules; most schools in the Northeastern United States end in June and start the Wednesday after Labor Day (the first Monday in September, with teachers reporting back on Tuesday), while the majority of schools in the Southern United States have schools end in May and start again in August.

The modern school calendar has its roots in 19th-century school-reform movements seeking standardization between urban and rural areas. Up until the mid-19th century, most schools were open for a winter and summer term. As individual schools merged into school districts and bureaucracies emerged to manage the newly formed school districts, school leaders and politicians identified a need to standardize calendars across regions. This standardization was related to the emerging tax structures, laws around compulsory education, as well as a general sentiment that school should be an essential component of American childhood.[18]

As the calendar was standardized across regions, school leaders took cues from a variety of factors, including attendance rates and the difficulty cooling school buildings. Many upper-class families left the city for cooler climates in the northeast during hot summer months, and as such, schools cancelled their summer sessions due to low daily attendance. As train travel became more affordable, middle-class families followed similar patterns, keeping their children home during the hottest months of the year or going away for a summer vacation.[19]

Additionally, many school leaders advocated for breaks so that students and teachers could rest their brains. Many 19th- and early 20th-century Americans educators believed that too much learning in hot weather was bad for one's health and could result in heat exhaustion and injury, particularly for younger children, whose minds were still developing.[20] The extended summer break was seen as a way for children and their teachers to rest and recover. In many places, teachers would use the summer months for their own learning and professional development, including participating in seminars and courses like those held at Chautauqua.

While the origins of the summer holiday break are often believed to be rooted in agriculture and the idea children were needed to assist with planting and harvesting crops, this is inaccurate. Most crops were planted in the spring and harvested in the fall.[21][22]

Uruguay

In Uruguay, summer holidays usually begin in early December, and finishes on March 1st.

Venezuela

In Venezuela, summer holidays begin in late June or early July and end in late September or early October.

Vietnam

In Vietnam, summer holidays usually begin in late May or early June and last for two months.

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Summer vacation.
  • Summer camp
  • Summer school
  • School holiday
  • Academic term
  • Dog days

References

  1. ^ Polikoff, David M. Quinn and Morgan (2017-09-14). "Summer learning loss: What is it, and what can we do about it?". Brookings. Retrieved 2020-04-17.
  2. ^ The summer slide: what we know and can do about summer learning loss. Alexander, Karl L.; Pitcock, Sarah; Boulay, Matthew. New York, NY. 2016. ISBN 978-0-8077-5799-4. OCLC 957134420.CS1 maint: others (link)
  3. ^ "Bolivia Education. Bolivia School. Education in Bolivia. School in Bolivia".
  4. ^ "Ваканции и неучебни дни за учебната 2016/2017 година". Министерство на образованието и науката (in Bulgarian). Министерство на образованието и науката.
  5. ^ Parlament České republiky (2004-09-24). "Zákon 561/2004 Sb. o předškolním, základním, středním, vyšším odborném a jiném vzdělávání (školský zákon): § 24 Školní rok". Ministerstvo vnitra České republiky. Retrieved 2014-06-09.
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ "School holidays Ireland".
  8. ^ "New Zealand Public Holidays, School Holidays, Special Events and Daylight Saving Dates".
  9. ^ School Summer holidays 2015 in Pakistan Archived 2016-03-05 at the Wayback Machine ApniMarzi.com (2015-04-13)
  10. ^ Poca, Ricky (7 January 2014). "September start for school year?". Inquirer News. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  11. ^ Ong G, Flores H (5 March 2014). "Public elementary, high schools will still follow June–March calendar". Philstar.com. Retrieved 26 May 2018. Luistro said only a few schools, mostly higher education institutions, have decided to move their school opening.
  12. ^ Elemia, Camille (23 May 2017). "Escudero wants synchronized opening of classes by 2018". Rappler. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  13. ^ Národná rada Slovenskej republiky (2008-07-02). "Zákon 245/2008 Z.z. o výchove a vzdelávaní (školský zákon): § 150 Organizácia školského roka". Ministerstvo spravodlivosti Slovenskej republiky. Retrieved 2014-06-09.
  14. ^ Bennett, Annie (2016-02-05). "Spain summer holidays guide". The Telegraph.
  15. ^ a b c "Surinamese mull school vacation change".
  16. ^ CH--Bern, psc Informatik. "Schulferien Stadt Zürich 2017". www.feiertagskalender.ch.
  17. ^ CH--Bern, psc Informatik. "Schulferien Kanton Tessin 2017". www.feiertagskalender.ch.
  18. ^ Gold, Kenneth (2002). Schools In: The History of Summer Education in American Public Schools. New York: Lang Publishing. ISBN 0-8204-5657-8.
  19. ^ Gold, Kenneth (Spring 2002). "From vacation to Summer School: The Transformation of Summer Education in New York City, 1894–1915". History of Education Quarterly. 42 (1): 18–49. doi:10.1111/j.1748-5959.2002.tb00099.x. S2CID 143153012.
  20. ^ Weiss, Joel; Robert S. Brown (December 2003). "Telling Tales Over Time: Constructing and Deconstructing the School Calendar". Teachers College Record. 105 (9): 1720–1757. doi:10.1046/j.1467-9620.2003.00307.x.
  21. ^ Lieszkovszky, Ida (2011-08-10). "Six Reasons Students Get Summer Off (And The Agrarian Calendar Isn't One of Them)". IdeaStream. National Public Radio. Retrieved 2018-06-02.
  22. ^ de Melker, Saskia; Weber, Sam (2014-09-07). "Agrarian roots? Think again. Debunking the myth of summer vacation's origins". PBS News Hour. PBS. Retrieved 2018-06-02.
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Summer_vacation&oldid=1060538426"
List of minimum annual leave by country

07-12-2021 · At least 20 working days (exact number depends on contract details, all national category-specific contracts guarantee 28 days), entirely paid, plus up to 104 hours of ROL, that means the reduction of working time (in Italian Riduzione Orario di Lavoro), that have to be used primarily in blocks of a few hours each time for family/personal needs (for example taking a child to the doctor, going ...

07-12-2021
Wikipedia list article
Minimum mandatory paid vacation days, normalized for a five-day workweek:
  •   No data at all
  •   No mandatory vacation
  •   1–5 days
  •   6–10 days
  •   11–15 days
  •   16–20 days
  •   21–22 days
  •   23–28 days

In the majority of nations, including all industrialised nations except the United States, advances in employee relations have seen the introduction of statutory agreements for minimum employee leave from work—that is the amount of entitlement to paid vacation and public holidays. Companies may offer contractually more time. Companies and the law may also differ as to whether public holidays are counted as part of the minimum leave.

Disparities in national minimums are still subject of debate regarding work-life balance and perceived differences between nations. These numbers usually refer to full-time employment – part-time workers may get a reduced number of days. In most countries, public holidays are paid and usually not considered part of the annual leave. Also, in most countries there are additional paid leave benefits such as parental leave and sick leave that are not listed here.

Methodology

For the purpose of comparison, the paid vacation column has been normalised to a five-day workweek. For instance, a calendar month is divided by seven and multiplied by five, while a six-day workweek day is divided by six and multiplied by five. The paid vacation column gives the minimum mandatory vacation days for an employee who has one year of service with the same employer.

In some countries, the public holidays are strictly bound to the calendar dates, so if they happen on Saturday or Sunday, they are "lost" for that year. As a result, the average number of paid extra free days can be lower than the table shows. For example, in the Czech Republic, where the official number of paid public holidays is 13, the average number of public holidays during working days in the years 2000–2016 was only 8.9 days. In other countries, such as the United Kingdom and the United States, the public holidays which would fall on Saturday or Sunday are moved to the nearest Monday or Friday.

Countries

Country and flag Minimum annual leave Paid vacation days
(five-day workweek)[1][2]
Paid public holidays[3][4] Total paid leave

(five-day workweek)

 Afghanistan Employees are entitled to 20 days recreational leave and 15 paid public holidays.[5] 20 15 35
 Albania Employees are entitled to 20 days of annual leave and 12 paid public holidays.[6] 20 12 32
 Algeria The paid annual leave is calculated on the basis of 2.5 days per month of work. The total duration of the leave cannot, however, exceed 30 calendar days per year.[7] Every employee is also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[4] 30 11 41
 Andorra Workers are entitled to 31 calendar days of paid leave after one year of employment. Before that, entitlement to leave is 2.5 days for every month worked. One period of leave must last two weeks or more, to allow an uninterrupted rest period.[8] Every employee is also entitled to 14 paid public holidays.[9] 31 14 45
 Angola The annual leave for workers is 22 days, not including weekends, complementary weekly rest days and holidays in this calculation.[7] Every employee is also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[10] 22 11 33
 Antigua and Barbuda The annual leave for an employee who has successfully passed his probationary period is at least one day per month of employment; 12 days per year of work performed. Every employee is also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[11] 12 11 23
 Argentina 14 calendar days (10 working days, from 0 to 5 years seniority), 21 calendar days (15 working days, from 5 to 10 years), 28 calendar days (20 working days, from 10 to 20 years) and 35 calendar days (25 working days, from 20 years). Employers can decide unilaterally when the leave days are taken. Every employee is also entitled to 15 paid public holidays and every year the government adds a few more holidays known as "bridge holidays" which means that a holiday last two days.[11][12] 10 19[13] 29
 Armenia Generally, the duration of annual leave is 20 working days. Extended annual leave up to 25 working days is granted to certain categories of employees whose work involves great nervous, emotional and intellectual strain and professional risk.[14] Every employee is also entitled to 12 paid public holidays.[15][16] 20 16[17][18] 36
 Australia For each year of service with their employer, an employee is entitled to a minimum of 4 weeks of paid annual leave, unless the employee is a shift-worker, in which case they are entitled to a minimum of 5 weeks of paid annual leave. Every employee is also entitled to 10 to 13 paid public holidays depending on the state and territory. Long service leave, which varies by jurisdiction, is also available to long-standing employees.[5][19] 20 10 30
 Austria Employees with fewer than 25 years of service are entitled to 25 days of annual leave. Employees who have been with the same firm for 25 years or more are entitled to 30 days of annual leave. Every employee is also entitled to 13 paid public holidays.[14][20][21][22] 25 13 38
 Azerbaijan Employees are entitled to a minimum of 21 basic calendar days of annual leave. Skilled employees, experts and senior employees are entitled to 30 basic calendar days of annual leave. Additional 2 days accrue on top of basic vacation every 5 years.[23] Every employee is also entitled to 19 paid public holidays.[24] 21 19 40
 The Bahamas 14 days after 1 year employment, 21 days after 7 years of employment.[11] Every employee is also entitled to 10 paid public holidays.[25][26] 10 10 20
 Bahrain An employee who has been in the service of an employer for at least one year is entitled to a paid annual leave not less than thirty days, with an average of 2.5 days for each month.[27] Every employee is also entitled to 14 paid public holidays.[28][29] 30 14 44
 Bangladesh All workers except tea plantation workers are entitled to 10 days of paid casual leave in each calendar year. An adult worker is entitled to: (a) for shop, commercial or industrial establishment, factory, or road transport service industry workers – one day's paid annual leave per 18 days of work; (b) for tea plantation workers – one day's paid annual leave per 22 days of work; and (c) for newspaper workers – one day's paid annual leave per 11 days of work. Every worker is also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[5][30] 10 11 21
 Barbados An employee who completes a year of employment with an employer is entitled to – (a) an annual holiday of not less than 3 weeks where he has been in the employment of that employer for less than 5 years; and (b) an annual holiday of not less than 4 weeks where he has been in the service of that employer for 5 years or more.[11] 15
 Belarus The length of basic annual leave is 24 calendar days. Plus 3 calendar days might be granted in addition for long time employment. Every employee is also entitled to 9 paid public holidays.[31] 24 9 33
 Belgium Before 2012, a worker after one year of full employment is entitled to: 24 working days if they work 6 days per week; and 20 working days if they work 5 days per week. This was challenged by the EU.[32] From June 2012, workers are allowed to take holidays in their first year of employment.[33] Workers are also entitled to 10 paid public holidays.[14][21] 20 10 30
 Belize Every employee is entitled to two weeks paid leave after a year of employment. If employment is terminated after three months but before a year, the employee must be paid average vacation pay. Every employee is also entitled to 13 paid public holidays.[11][34] 14 13 27
 Benin Unless there are more favorable provisions in collective agreements or employment contracts, the worker acquires the right to leave, to be paid by the employer, at the rate of 2 working days per month of effective service. A working days is every day other than the day of weekly rest period and holidays. Every worker is also entitled to 13 paid public holidays.[7][35] 24 13 37
 Bhutan 9
 Bolivia There are different scales of annual leave depending on the seniority of the worker: workers with from 1 to 5 years of service are entitled to 15 working days; from 5 to 10 years: 20 working days; and from 10 years onwards: 30 working days. Every worker is also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[11] 15/20/30 11 26/31/41
 Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnia and Herzegovina's entities, Republika Srpska and the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, as well as Brčko District, have different work laws.

Both entities have a minimum of 20 working days off, while the number of additional days varies. In Brčko District, workers have 18 days off. In Republika Srpska workers have additional 1 day for every 5 years of work with the same employer and an additional 2 days for religious holidays. In the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina workers have 2 paid days for religious holidays and, optionally, 2 unpaid days for religious holidays. The number of public holidays also varies: in Republika Srpska around 11, in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina around 10 and in Brčko District around 9. The number of public holidays varies based on te predominant religious group in the entity. The Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina consists of 10 cantons, any of which can have their own laws that can affect the number of public holidays.

20–30 9-11 29-41
 Botswana Every employer is required to grant to all employees leave with basic pay at the rate of not less than 1.25 days per month. Every employee is also entitled to 14 paid public holidays.[7] 15 14 29
 Brazil The length of annual leave depends on the number of days of absence from work: 30 calendar days (22 working days, based on a 5-day workweek) if the worker was absent no more than 5 days; 24 calendar days (18 working days) if the worker was absent between 6 and 14 days; 18 calendar days (14 working days) if the worker was absent between 15 and 23 days; 12 calendar days (10 working days) if the worker was absent between 24 and 32 days. Every employee is also entitled to 7 national paid public holidays, 1 state paid holiday, and up to 4 religious municipal paid holidays.[11][36] 10/14/18/22 12 22/26/30/34
 Brunei Darussalam [11] 7 11 18
 Bulgaria An employee has the right to paid annual leave of at least four weeks for each calendar year.[14][21] If a public holiday falls on Saturday or Sunday, the following Monday is a holiday.[citation needed] 20 12 32
 Burkina Faso The employee has a right to a paid leave chargeable to the employer, at 2.5 calendar days per month of effective service. Every employee is also entitled to 15 paid public holidays.[7][37] 30 15 45
 Burundi Workers are entitled to 1 and 2/3 working days per month of completed of service.[7] Every employee is also entitled to 13 paid public holidays.[38] 17 13 30
 Cape Verde Every worker in an employment contract for an indeterminate period is entitled to twenty-two days of annual leave.[7] There are no legal provisions for pay on public holidays.[39] 22 0 22
 Cambodia All workers are entitled to paid annual leave at the rate of 1.5 work days per month of continuous service. However, the length of paid leave entitlement shall be increased according to seniority, at the rate of one day per 3 years of service.[5] Every employee is also entitled to 27 paid public holidays.[40] 18 27 45
 Cameroon Workers acquire the right to annual leave at the rate of one and a half days per month of effective service, paid by the employer.[7] 18
 Canada In Canada, vacation time is set by the provinces and territories for all employees except federal employees and employees of federally-regulated industries such as telecommunications. Employees are entitled to start out with two weeks of paid vacation in all provinces except Saskatchewan where employees are entitled to three weeks of paid annual leave.[41] Ten provinces and territories grant a third week of vacation after working for a set period of time, one grants a fourth week, and two grant no additional extension.[42] Federal employees are entitled initially to three weeks vacation, increasing to four weeks after eight years of service.[43] In addition, employees are entitled to 6–10 paid public holidays depending on the province.[44] 10–20 6-10 16-30
 Central African Republic Workers are entitled to leave at the rate of 2 working days per month worked.[7] 24
 Chad Workers are entitled to two days per month of paid leave - to be paid by the employer. One month of effective work is the period equivalent to 4 weeks or 24 days of work. Every worker is also entitled to 3 paid public holidays.[7] 24 3 27
 Chile The duration of the annual leave is 15 working days.[11] Every worker is also entitled to 15 paid public holidays.[45] 15 15 30
 China The duration of the annual leave entitlement is: (a) 5 days for employees who have accumulatively worked for 1–10 years; (b) 10 days for employees who have accumulatively worked for 10–20 years; and (c) 15 days for employees who have accumulatively worked for more than 20 years. Employers who offer more vacation time are legally obligated to grant it.[46] Every worker is also entitled to 11 paid public holidays, which includes two semi-annual one-week holidays known as the Golden Weeks.[5][47] 5/10/15 11 16/21/26
 Colombia Employees are entitled to 15 consecutive working days of paid annual leave. Every employee is also entitled to 18 paid public holidays.[11][48] 15 18 33
 Comoros Workers are entitled to annual leave at the rate of at least 2 and half days per month of work. In order to determine the duration of the leave, it shall be considered as a month of work, the period equivalent to 4 weeks or 24 days of work.[7] 25
 Democratic Republic of Congo The duration of annual leave has to be at least one day for every month of effective service, for worker over the age of 18. It shall be of at least one and a half day for workers under the age of 18. It shall be increased of one day per month every 5 years of seniority in the same employer or replaced employer.[7] 12
 Republic of Congo Workers are entitled, after one year of service, to 26 working days of annual leave paid by the employer.[7] 26
 Costa Rica Employees are entitled to 2 weeks minimum of annual leave after 50 weeks of work performed with the same employer. Every employee is also entitled to 9 paid public holidays.[11][49] 10 9 19
 Croatia An employee has the right to paid annual leave in the duration of at least four weeks for each calendar year and 13 paid public holidays.[14][21][50] 20 13 33
 Cuba Every worker is entitled to enjoy one month of paid annual leave after 11 months of effective work. Workers are also entitled to 9 paid public holidays.[11] 22 9 33
 Cyprus 20 working days of leave for workers on a five-day week and 24 working days of leave for workers on a six-day week over a period of one year's employment.[14][21] Every employee is also entitled to 14 paid public holidays.[51] 20 14 34
 Czech Republic The basic vacation allowance is a minimum of four weeks per calendar year and there are 13 paid public holidays.[52][53][54] Many employers give one week extra (so the total is five weeks of paid annual leave) as a bonus. Public holidays which happen on Saturday or Sunday are lost for the particular year – thus the average number of public holidays during working days in the years 2000–2016 was only 8.9 days. Employees of employers who are not part of the private sector or engaged in non-commercial activities are entitled to a vacation allowance of 5 weeks. Teachers and the academic staff of higher education institutions are entitled to a vacation allowance of 8 weeks per calendar year.[14][21] 20 13 33
 Denmark Employees are entitled to 25 days of annual leave per year worked, prorated at 2.08 days per month.[21][55] In addition most employees have an extra week of holiday through the Additional Sixth Week agreement.

Every employee is also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[56]

25 11 36
 Djibouti Employees are entitled to two and half working days of paid leave per month. Every employee is also entitled to 10 paid public holidays.[7] 25 10 35
 Dominica Employees are entitled under five years of continuously service two weeks paid annual leave, and for five years and over of continuously service three weeks of paid annual leave. Every employee is also entitled to 12 paid public holidays.[11] 10 12 22
 Dominican Republic The employer shall provide every employee a paid vacation period of two weeks, according to the following scale: After a period of at least 1 year and up to 5 years, 14 days with full pay; After a continuous period of work of not less than 5 years, 18 days with full pay. Every employee is also entitled to 13 paid public holidays.[11] 10 13 23
 Ecuador Every worker shall be entitled to enjoy 15 consecutive days of paid annual leave, including the non working days.[11] Every employee is also entitled to 12 paid public holidays.[57][58] 11 12 23
 Egypt Employees are entitled to 21 days of paid annual leave, though they must wait six months before taking their first day off. After five consecutive years of employment, an employee may take one month of paid leave to make a religious pilgrimage. An employee's paid leave entitlement increases to 30 days of paid annual leave after 10 years of employment or when the employee reaches the age of 50, whichever one comes first. Every employee is also entitled to 13 paid public holidays.[7][59][60] 21 13 34
 El Salvador The length of annual leave is 15 days. Every employee is also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[11][61] 15 11 26
 Equatorial Guinea Workers are entitled to one month of paid annual leave, for each year of continuous work. After 10 years of service, annual leave shall be increased one day per year worked.[7] 30
 Eritrea An employee is entitled to annual leave with pay amounting to: fourteen working days for the first year of service; and fourteen working days plus one working each additional year of service. Annual leave may not exceed 35 working days.[7] 12
 Estonia Minimum annual holiday is 28 calendar days, unless the employee and the employer have agreed on a longer period, or unless otherwise provided by law.[62] Every employee is also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[63] 20 11 31
 Ethiopia Employees are entitled to no less than 14 working days of annual leave for the first one year of service, and 14 working days plus one working day for every additional year of service.[7] Every employee is also entitled to 13 paid public holidays.[64] 12 13 25
 European Union European Union legislation mandates that all 27 member states must by law grant all employees a minimum of 4 weeks of paid vacation.[65] 20 0 20
 Fiji Workers are entitled to 10 days paid annual leave for each complete year of service. Every employee is also entitled to 12 paid public holidays.[5] 10 12 22
 Finland 5 weeks (30 days with Saturdays sometimes, but not Sundays, counted as holidays) is the minimum mandated annual leave by law.[66] Workers are also entitled to 11 paid public holidays on average.[67] After working for the same company for a long period, many employers raise the 30 to 36 days (so-called long holidays). (Many employers in Finland give a holiday bonus (lomaraha) every year; this holiday bonus can be converted to extra holiday - giving another 13 days of holiday (or 18 days for those on 'long' holidays).[21][55] 25 11 36
 France 5 weeks (30 days with Saturdays, but not Sundays counted as holidays) plus up to 22 days of RTT (Réduction du Temps de Travail, English: Reduction of Working Time) for the employees that choose to work more than 35 hours per week - the "limit" is 39 per week, further additional hours are compensated in almost all the cases by money and not by additional leave hours. Bonus days off are given to people who take a part of their annual leave outside summer (3 days grant 1 bonus day off, 6 days grant 2 bonus days off). Combining all these rules, in a few public offices and in a few companies like Orange, the resulting total, for certain employees, might be of 9.5 paid vacation weeks (5 weeks of vacation 4 weeks of RTT 0.5 week of bonus days off). Furthermore, there are 11 paid public holidays.[21][55][68][69] 25-37 11 36-48
 Gabon Workers are entitled to leave, to be paid by the employer, of 2 working days per month of effective service. The workers under the age of 18 are entitled to 2 and a half working days. Every worker is also entitled to 14 paid public holidays.[7] 20 14 34
 Gambia 21
 Georgia 24 15 39
 Germany 24 working days (defined as all calendar days that are not Sundays or public holidays). Therefore, a worker with a 5-day workweek has the right to 20 days off.[14] However, it is quite customary that companies concede other 10 days of paid leave, bringing the average to 30 days off.[70] There is one national public holiday (German Unity Day). States regulate the remaining paid public holidays which vary between 10[71] and 13 in total, some of them being held nationwide.[55][72] The Catholic parts of Bavaria (around 1700 communities in the Land of Bavaria, including the major cities of Munich and Augsburg, but not Nuremberg) provide the most rest days with 13 public holidays.[73] The Bavarian city of Augsburg is a special case as it has 14 public holidays as it celebrates Friedensfest (Peace Festival) in addition to the 13 holidays in Catholic Bavaria. Civil employees receive a minimum of 30 days after a law against age discrimination was passed in 2012.[74] In most states, most employees are additionally entitled to 5 days per year paid education leave (Bildungsurlaub).[75] 20 10 30
 Ghana In any undertaking every worker is entitled to not less than 15 working days leave with full pay in any calendar year of continuous service.[7] Every worker is also entitled to 13 paid public holidays.[76] 15 13 28
 Greece Workers on a five-day week are entitled to a 20 working days or 24 working days for six-day week workers. The leave entitlement is increased by one working day for each year of employment in addition to the first year, up to 26 working days, or up to 22 working days if the undertaking operates a five-day week.[14] There are 12 mandatory paid public holidays plus one town/city specific "patron saint day".[55][77] 20 12 32
 Grenada Workers are entitled to a period of annual leave with pay of not less than two weeks during the first year of employment and thereafter, three weeks. Every worker is also entitled to 13 paid public holidays.[11] 10 13 23
 Guatemala Employees are entitled to have at least 15 working days of vacations.[78] To have the right for vacations the worker must have at least 150 calendar days of continuous work.[79] It is forbidden for a worker to accept extra payment instead of the vacations nor take another job during this time.[80] Vacations must be paid in advance.[81] Every employee is also entitled to 10 paid public holidays.[82] 15 10 25
 Guinea The employee is entitled to leave, paid by the employer, at a rate of 2 and half days per month of effective service. Employees are also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[7][83] 22 11 33
 Guinea-Bissau The annual leave shall be of 30 consecutive days, not counting weekly rest periods nor initial or final holidays.[7] 22
 Guyana Every worker being in employment shall be allowed a period of holidays with pay of not less than one day for each completed month of employment computed from the date of engagement.[11] There are no legal provisions for pay on public holidays[84] 12 0 12
 Haiti Any employee continuously working upon one year of service is entitled to paid leave of at least 15 consecutive days, comprising 13 working days and two Sundays. Public holidays and interruptions of work due to sickness or maternity enjoyed by the worker should not be deducted from the fifteen days off. Employees are also entitled to 16 paid public holidays.[11] 11 16 27
 Honduras The period of annual leave differs in relation to the time of work performed with the same employer: 10 consecutive working days after one year of service; 12 consecutive working days after two years' consecutive service; 15 consecutive working days after three years' consecutive service; 20 consecutive working days after four or more years' consecutive service. Employees are also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[11][85] 8 11 19
 Hong Kong 7 days (1 to 2 years), add one day per year until 14 days (3 years).[86] Employees are also entitled to 17 paid employee holidays.[87] 7-14 17 24-31
 Hungary 20 working days (increasing up to 30 with age). The employee will get additional days for children. Two days for one child, 4 days for two children and 7 days for more than two children.[14][88] Employees are also entitled to 13 paid public holidays, however public holidays which happen on Saturday or Sunday are lost for the particular year.[89] Unpaid leave can be requested by the Employee that can be granted upon after Employer deliberation. Employee has a right for Unpaid leave under the following circumstances: Caring for child under 3 years (usually during maternity leave), caring for children under 10 years if it is necessary and the Employee receives child caring aid, long term caring for a relative up to a maximum of 2 years (requires official medical verification), volunteer reservist military service.[90] 20 13 33
 Iceland The legislation provides for a minimum of two working days of holiday for each month in employment during the past holiday allowance year (1 May to 30 April). The minimum holiday for each year is therefore 24 working days. Employees are also entitled to 12 paid public holidays.[14][91] 24 14 38
 India Adult workers in factories, mines, and plantations are entitled to one day off for every twenty days worked the previous year, which generally amounts to 12 days a year. Minors are entitled to 15 days. This does not apply to employees of factories of government-owned railways, who are governed by a separate set of leave entitlements decided by the government. Leave entitlements in India generally vary among states and industries, with local governments setting minimum leave entitlements and individual companies offering their own paid leave benefits. On average, Indians receive 24 days of paid leave a year. Employees are also entitled to 15-20 paid public holidays, depending on the region.[5][92][93][94][95][96][97] 12 15 27
 Indonesia Employees are entitled to a minimum of 12 days paid leave. They are also entitled to 15 public holidays. Public workers are entitled to 9 days of joint holiday (cuti bersama), whereas private employers can choose to follow joint holidays. After six years employment, employees are entitled to a month's worth of leave in their seventh and eighth year. There are no legal provisions for pay on public holidays.[5][98][99] 12 15 27
 Iran The annual paid leave entitlement is one month, including four Fridays.[5] 26 27 53
 Iraq A worker shall have a right to 20 days of leave for each year of work. A worker employed in work which is arduous or harmful to health shall have a right to 30 days of paid leave for each year of work. The length of a worker's annual leave shall be increased by 2 days after every additional 5 years of continuous service with the same employer.[28] 20
 Ireland Employees are entitled to 4 weeks of paid annual leave and 9 paid public holidays.[55][100] 20 9 29
 Israel A minimum of 12 days for employees with a five-day workweek and 14 days for employees with a six-day workweek. Following four years of employment, the number of vacation days rises by two per year.[101] An employee can accumulate a maximum of 28 vacation days under the law.[102] There are also 9 paid public holidays, and 4 holidays where, despite not being mandatory, many businesses and government offices offer collective or optional paid leave. 12 9 21
 Italy At least 20 working days (exact number depends on contract details, all national category-specific contracts guarantee 28 days), entirely paid, plus up to 104 hours of ROL, that means the reduction of working time (in Italian Riduzione Orario di Lavoro), that have to be used primarily in blocks of a few hours each time for family/personal needs (for example taking a child to the doctor, going to the bank etc.) but may be utilized as well, just for the unused part of them and just if the company/the collective contract allows that, to get additional vacation hours/days, or to shorten of 1 or 2 hours the working day on Fridays. Employees also receive 12 paid public holidays, plus one town/city specific "patron saint day".[55][103] Workers also have a right to 15 days of paid leave for their wedding.[104]

Employees have the right to paid leave to deal with sick children up to 3 years, or unpaid leave for older ones.

A special provision[105] allows people who are in charge of disabled children or relatives to have more days of paid leave.

20 12 32
 Ivory Coast The worker is entitled to annual leave, paid by the employer, at the rate of 2 working days per month of effective service. Young workers under the age of 18 are entitled to two and 2/10 working days per month of effective service. The annual leave is increased at the rate of 2 days after 15 years of seniority in the same company; 4 days after 20 years of seniority in the same company; 6 days after 25 years of seniority in the same company; and 8 days after 30 years of seniority in the same company. Employees also receive 14 paid public holidays.[7] 20 14 34
 Jamaica Workers who have worked up to 220 days enjoy 10 days maximum (if they have worked for a minimum of 110 days) calculated as follows; 1/22 of the number of days of work. Any fraction of a day of holiday shall be reckoned as 1 day. For workers who have worked more than 220 days: 2 working weeks. For workers with 10 years of service or more and who have worked more than 220 days in each qualifying year: 3 working weeks.[11] 10
 Japan The initial annual leave entitlement is 10 days of leave. Workers who have been employed continuously for at least one and half years shall be granted one additional day of leave for each year of service, up to a maximum of 20 days of leave.[5][106] There are no legal provisions for pay on public holidays.[55][107] However Japan does have 16 national public holidays established by the Public Holiday Law. 10-20 16 26-36
 Jersey Employees are entitled to two weeks of paid annual leave.[108] Employees are also entitled to 9 paid public holidays.[109] 10 9 19
 Jordan Each employee shall be entitled to an annual leave with full pay for fourteen 14 days per each year of service, increased to 21 days after five years of service.[28] 14 10-14 24-28
 Kazakhstan Employees are entitled to 24 calendar days of paid annual leave.[14][110] 24 16 40
 Kenya An employee is entitled to not less than 21 working days after every 12 consecutive months of service with his employer. Where employment is terminated after then completion of two or more consecutive months of service during any 12 months of leave-earning period, to not less than 1.75 days of leave for each completed month of service. Employees are also entitled to 10 paid public holidays.[7] 21 10 28
 Kiribati 0
 Kosovo Labor Law mandates at least 20 days of paid annual leave during a calendar year.[111] In addition, employees get one additional day of paid annual leave for every 5 years of service,[111] whereas civil servants get one day of annual leave for every 2 years of service.[112]

Employees are entitled to 12 paid days of public holidays. If public holidays fall on Saturday or Sunday, the following working day is a non-working day.[113]

20 12 32
 Kuwait Every worker is entitled to enjoy a paid annual leave of 30 days. In addition, the worker who completes 2 continuous years in the service of his employer shall be entitled to a paid leave of 21 days for performing Haj rituals, provided that he should not have previously performed the Haj. Workers are also entitled to 13 paid public holidays.[28][114] 30 13 43
 Kyrgyzstan 20
 Laos The general annual leave entitlement is 15 days of leave per year.[5] 15
 Latvia Employees are entitled to 4 calendar weeks of paid annual leave.[14] 20 12 32
 Lebanon Every wage-earner or salary-earner employed in an establishment for at least one year is entitled to an annual leave of 15 days with full pay. Workers are also entitled to 22 days of public holidays [28] 15 22 37
 Lesotho An employee shall be entitled to one working day of holiday in respect of each month of continuous employment with the same employer, i.e. a minimum of 12 working days of holiday in each year. Employees are also entitled to 10 paid public holidays.[7] 12 10 22
 Liberia Employees are entitled to: (a) For continuous service with the same employer for twenty-four months, the number of working days in two weeks, and thereafter for each additional twelve months, with the same employer, the number of working days in three weeks; and (b) For continuous service with the same employer for sixty months and thereafter, the number of working days in four weeks. Employees are also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[115][116] 10[117] 11 21
 Libya Every worker is entitled annually to 30 days leave. Workers who have reached the age of 50 or have completed 20 years of service are entitled 45 days.[7] 22
 Lithuania Employees are entitled to 20 calendar days of paid annual leave.[14][118] Employees are also entitled to 14 paid public holidays.[119] 20 14 34
 Luxembourg The legal duration of annual leave is 26 working days per year for private sector employees. Public sector employees are entitled to 32 days per year, increasing to 34 from age 50 and 36 from age 55. Employees (both public and private sector) with specific disabilities are entitled to a further 6 days' annual leave.[14] All workers are also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[120]

Extraordinary paid leave – which is not deducted from the annual leave allowance if taken – is granted in certain personal circumstances. In some cases, the number of days granted depends on whether an employee works in the public or private sector. Leave taken in the event of a death also applies if it is a relative of the employee's spouse or civil partner who has died: e.g. the death of an employee's mother-in-law entitles the employee to 3 days' leave.[121][122]

Type of extraordinary leave Civil servants Private-sector employees
Marriage 6 days 3 days
Civil partnership 6 days 1 day
Death of spouse/civil partner/parent/adult child 3 days 3 days
Death of child under 18 5 days 5 days
Death of grandparent or grandchild 1 day 1 day
Death of sibling living in same household 3 days -
Marriage of child 2 days 1 day
Moving house (once per 3-year period) 2 days 2 days
Adoption of child under 16 2 days 10 days
Birth of child (for father only) 10 days 10 days
Enlisting for military service 1 day -
Private sector: 26


Public sector: 32

Age 50-54: 34

Age 55 : 36

11 37


43

45

47

 Madagascar Workers are entitled to leave paid by the employer at 2.5 days per month and also to 13 paid public holidays.[7] 22 13 35
 Malawi 18
 Malaysia Starts at 8 days per year for first 2 years employment with an employer. Increases to 12 days per year for between 2 and 5 years employment and 16 days per year for 5 or more years. Employees are also entitled to 11 paid public holidays in Peninsular Malaysia and Labuan, 14 days in Sabah and 16 days in Sarawak.[5] In addition to the federal public holidays, each state and federal territory has designated four to six state public holidays, bringing the total number of (federal and state) public holidays to 19 days in Labuan, Penang, Sabah and Sarawak and 18 days in the rest of the country. 8 11 19
 Maldives 22
 Mali 22
 Malta Every worker is entitled to paid annual leave of at least the equivalent in hours of five weeks and one working day calculated on the basis of a 40-hour working week and 8-hour working day. Workers are also entitled to 14 paid public holidays.[14] 27 14 41
 Marshall Islands 0
 Mauritania After the reference period of 12 months, a worker is entitled to 1.5 days of leave per month of effective service. An exception is 3 days per month for employees whose normal residence is not in Mauritania. One additional day annual leave is granted for 10–15 years of seniority, two additional days for 15–20 years seniority and 3 days for a seniority exceeding 20 years. Employees are also entitled to 7 paid public holidays.[7] 15 7 22
 Mauritius Every worker, other than a part-time worker, who remains in continuous employment with the same employer for a period of 12 consecutive months is entitled, during each subsequent period of 12 months while he remains in continuous employment, to 20 working days of annual leave or such similar leave under any other name. Besides that every worker is entitled to an extra 2 days of leave in every year and 16 paid public holidays.[7] 22 16 38
 Mexico Employers are legally obligated to grant employees 6 working days as minimum, after one year of service with the same employer. This duration shall be increased by two working days (up to a maximum of 12) for each subsequent year of service. After the fourth year, the vacation period shall be increased by two days for every five years of service. Workers who perform discontinuous and seasonal work are entitled to an annual holiday period in proportion to the number of the working days performed in the year. Employees are also entitled to 7 paid public holidays.[11] 6 7 13
 Micronesia 0
 Moldova All employees have the right to an annual paid holiday, with duration of not less than 28 calendar days without taking into account the non working holidays. Employees of special sectors (education, health service, public service, etc.) can be granted annual leave of a different duration.[14] There are no legal provisions for pay on public holidays.[123] 20 0 20
 Mongolia 15 working days for the 1 year of employment. Increase up to 29 working days after 32 years of employment. 48 working days paid vacation for teachers and professors for all levels of school, kindergarten and university regardless of the number of years of service. There are no identified legal provisions for pay on public holidays.[5][124] 15 0 15
 Montenegro 21
 Morocco Every employee, having worked at least 6 months continuously in the same company, is entitled to paid annual leave as it follows: 1 and 1/2 day of effective work for every month of service; and 2 days of effective work for every month of service for those aged under 18. The paid annual leave is increased in one and a half day of effective work for an entire period, continue or not, of 5 years of service. However, this increase cannot be accumulated when the total annual leave has reached the limit of 30 working days. An "effective day of work" day is that which is not a weekly rest day, a holiday and general holidays of the company. The working month is defined as: 26 effective working days or 191 working hours in the non agricultural sector or 208 in the agricultural sector. Employees are also entitled to 13 paid public holidays.[7] 15 13 25
 Mozambique Employees are entitled to one day for every month of actual service, during the first year of service; two days for every month of actual service, during the second year of service; and thirty days for every year of actual service, from the third year onward.[7] Employees are also entitled to 9 paid public holidays.[125] 10 9 19
 Myanmar Employees over the age of 15 years are entitled to 10 consecutive days of leave per year. Employees under the age of 15 years are entitled to 14 consecutive days leave per year. Employees are also entitled to 14 paid public holidays.[5] 10 14 24
 Namibia Every employee is entitled to at least four consecutive weeks annual leave in respect of each annual leave cycle (which means the period of 12 consecutive months employment with the same employer immediately following an employee's commencement of employment or the completion of the last annual leave cycle). If the number of days in an ordinary workweek are 6 the annual leave entitlement in working days is 24.[7] 20
 Nauru No paid annual leave.[126] 0
   Nepal Every employee is entitled to paid home leave at the rate of 1 day for every 20 days that he works. Employees are also entitled to 13 paid public holidays.[5] 15 13 28
 Netherlands Workers are entitled to four times the number of days they work per week. In this respect, for a five-day working week the worker is entitled to 20 days of annual leave.[14][127] There are no legal provisions for pay on public holidays.[128] 20 8 28
 New Zealand Employees are entitled to not less than 4 weeks of paid annual holiday. Employees are also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[5][129] 20 11 31
 Nicaragua Every worker is entitled to enjoy 15 days of continuous and remunerated annual leave after 6 months of uninterrupted work with the same employer. Workers are also entitled to 9 paid public holidays.[11] 11 9 20
 Niger Workers are entitled to 30 calendar days (two and a half calendar days per month of work). Seniority entitles a worker to additional days of leave: 2 additional days after 20 years with the same enterprise; 4 additional days after 25 years; 6 additional days after 30 years. Workers are also entitled to 12 paid public holidays.[7] 22 12 34
 Nigeria Every worker is entitled after twelve months continuous service to a holiday with full pay of at least six working days.[7] Most employees in both public sector and private firms are entitled to 20 vacation days per year this is exclusive of the National and Religious holidays which can be as a high as 12 days in a year as both Muslims and Christians get days off for festivities regardless of which religion was celebrating . 5
 North Macedonia Employees are entitled to 20-26 working days, as specified in a collective agreement in accordance with years of service and working conditions; 3 additional days for older workers. There are 12 public holidays for all citizens. More public holidays available based on which religion or ethnic group they are a part of.[14] 20 12 32
 Norway Employers are required that employees have 25 working days of leave in connection with holidays each holiday year. Holiday leave is accrued from previous full year of employment, ie in the first year of employment, a worker is entitled to 25 working days of leave, but they will be unpaid. After one year of full employment, the employee shall be entitled to 25 working days of paid holidays. All days count as working days except Sundays and statutory church or public holidays.[14][130][131][132] 25 10 35
 Oman Employees are entitled to 30 days of annual leave and are also entitled to 9 paid public holidays.[133] 22 9 31
 Pakistan Factory workers, employees of commercial establishments, and road transportation workers are entitled to 14 days of holidays, inclusive of weekly rest days, provided they complete a full year of continuous employment. Those who spend more than 90 days on sickness, accident, or authorized leave, and one day or more on unauthorized leave or on an illegal strike lose this entitlement. Mine workers are entitled to one day of leave for every 17 days of work below ground and one day for every 20 days worked above ground, generally amounting to more than 14 days. Newspaper employees are not entitled to a fixed set of days by law, but rather to paid leave lasting at least 1/11th as long as they spend on duty. Factory workers are also entitled to 17 paid public holidays. On average, corporations and government offices provide at least 15 paid public holidays per year.[5][134][135] 14 15 29
 Palau 0
 Palestine for employees with less than 5 years of employment are entitled to 14 working days of holidays, after 5 years will be increased to 21 working days. 21 12 33
 Panama Employees are entitled to enjoy 30 days of annual leave and are also entitled to 10 paid public holidays.[11] 30 10 40
 Papua New Guinea Employees are entitled to 14 consecutive days of annual leave, including non-working days. Employees are also entitled to 9 paid public holidays.[5] 10 9 19
 Paraguay Every worker shall be entitled to a paid annual leave after a year of work within same employer that shall be at least: a) 12 consecutive working days for workers with less than 5 years of continuous service; b) 18 consecutive working days after 5 years and less than 10 years of continuous service; c) 30 consecutive days after 10 years of continuous service.[11] Employees are also entitled to 12 paid public holidays.[136] 10 12 22
 Peru Employees are entitled to 30 calendar days of annual leave and are also entitled to 12 paid public holidays.[11] 30 12 42
 Philippines Employees are entitled to 5 days of paid service incentive leave per year.[137] Employees are also entitled to 12 paid public holidays.[5] 5 12 17
 Poland 20 working days per year during the first 10 years of employment and 26 working days thereafter. Secondary and tertiary education partially counts towards employment time,[138] ranging from 3 years for basic vocational school, up to 8 years for bachelor's degree. Workers are also entitled to 13 paid public holidays.[139] 20/26 13 33/39
 Portugal Workers are entitled to paid holidays which are mandatory and have a minimum duration of 22 working days. Workers are also entitled to 13 paid public holidays. However, when a public holiday is during the weekend, the holiday is not recovered, which means that in all years, a number of these holidays are actually not considered as paid days. Thus, on average the effective paid public holidays are 9. [14][140] 22 9 31
 Puerto Rico Employees are entitled to 15 days of paid annual leave. There are no legal provisions for pay on public holidays.[141] 15 0 15
 Qatar Annual leave shall not be less than three weeks for the worker whose service is less than five years and four weeks for the worker whose service is more than five years. Workers are also entitled to 10 paid public holidays.[28] 15 10 25
 Romania Workers are entitled to a minimum of 20 days of paid leave per year;[14] 23 for the handicapped, underage, or those working in difficult or dangerous conditions. Varying numbers of extra paid days are available for life events such as marriage or death in the family, child birth (for the partner who is not on paternal/maternal leave), donating blood, or workplace relocation. Workers are also entitled to 13 paid public holidays - however public holidays which happen on Saturday or Sunday are lost for the particular year.;[142] as well as up to 90 days of unpaid leave every year for the purpose of preparation for educational degree exams. Unpaid leave can also be requested for any other reason, but the employer is not legally obligated to agree. 20 13 34
 Russia Workers are entitled to 28 calendar days of annual leave (if taken in parts, one of them should not be less than 14 days), people working in prescribed Far North and Far East zones have additional 5-24 calendar days.[143]14 paid public holidays. This usually translates into 42 calendar days (66 calendar days in prescribed North territories, which appears to be one of the longest in the World) of leave because most holidays coinciding with weekend days are moved to the following working day.[14][144][145][146] 28-52 14 42-66
 Rwanda Employees are entitled to a paid leave at the employer's expenses, on the basis of one and a half working days per month of effective continued work. Official holidays are not considered as part of the annual paid leave. The employee benefits from one working day per year of annual paid leave for every three years of experience in the same institution. However, annual paid leave, in any case, can not exceed twenty one (21) working days.[7] Employees are also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[147] 15 11 26
 Samoa Employees are entitled to at least 10 days’ paid annual leave to be taken on days mutually agreed between the employer and the employee.[148] Employees are also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[149][150] 10 11 21
 Saint Kitts and Nevis Every worker shall be entitled to a paid annual leave of not less than 14 days, after one year of employment. Sundays and public holidays shall not be included in the annual leave period and so this period shall be increased by one day for each Sunday or public holiday occurring therein.[11] 12
 Saint Lucia Employees are entitled to 14 working days of paid annual leave after a minimum employment of twelve months; after five years employees are entitled to 21 working days. Employees are also entitled to 13 paid public holidays.[151][152] 14 13 27
 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 16
 San Marino All workers are entitled to annual leave with pay, varying from 1 to more than 15 years of service from 10 to 20 days a year for wage earners and from 1 to more than 12 years of service from 10 to 12 days a year for salaried employees and intermediary staff.[14] 10
 São Tomé and Príncipe Workers are entitled to 30 consecutive days of annual leave, not counting weekly rest periods nor initial or final holidays. Employees are also entitled to 9 paid public holidays.[7] 25 9 34
 Saudi Arabia A worker shall be entitled to a prepaid annual leave of not less than twenty one days, to be increased to a period of not less than thirty days if the worker spends five consecutive years in the service of the employer. Workers are also entitled to 10 paid public holidays.[28] 21 9 30
 Senegal Workers are entitled to 2 days of annual leave for each month of work performed over a year.[7] Employees are also entitled to 12 paid public holidays.[153] 20 12 32
 Serbia 20 working days minimum (effectively 4 weeks, law defines working week as 5 working days for purpose of paid vacation),[14] plus 9 bank holidays and up to two more days depending on religion of employee. 20 11 31
 Seychelles A worker is entitled to 21 days of paid annual leave or, where the employment is for less than a year, to 1.75 days for each month of employment, the aggregate number of days being rounded up upon addition to the highest integer.[7] 21 13 34
 Sierra Leone 18
 Singapore A worker is entitled to minimum 7 days, with 1 additional day per year up to a minimum of 14 days. No statutory minimum leave for seamen, domestic workers, or employees in managerial or executive positions. Employees are also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[5][154][155] 7-14 11 18-25
 Slovakia The duration of the paid annual leave is at least five weeks, provided that seven consecutive calendar days is understood as one week paid holiday. Employees are also entitled to 15 paid public holidays.[156] 25 15 40
 Slovenia A worker has the right to annual leave in an individual calendar year, which may not be shorter than 4 weeks, regardless of whether he works full-time or part-time. Older people get five more days, mother with children gets three to five more days. Maximum leave is 35 days per year. Sundays and public holidays are not counted to the leave. They are free for all.[14] 20 13 33
 Solomon Islands Each worker is entitled to be given by his employer a holiday at the rate of not less than 1.25 working days for each complete calendar month of employment in an undertaking.[5] 15 0 15
 Somalia Workers are entitled to 15 days of paid annual leave and are also entitled to 9 paid public holidays.[7] 13 9 22
 South Africa 21 consecutive days, or 1 day for every 17 days worked, or 1 hour for every 17 hours worked,[157] Regular workers may take a further 3 days of family responsibility leave. Leave legislation does not apply to members of the National Defence Force, National Intelligence Agency, South African Secret Service or unpaid volunteers working for a charity.[158] Employees are also entitled to 12 paid public holidays.[7][159] 15 12 27
 South Korea 15 days[5][160] and for workers who have worked 3 years, one day will be added to every two years continuously worked up to a maximum of 25 days. Despite the employment law, it is strictly regulated to use a paid leave due to Korean culture, which is often perceived as hierarchical. Generally, it is common practice that workers only get a few days off for a year regardless of how many off days are left, though extra bonuses might be paid out for the work.[161][162] 15-25 15 30-40
 South Sudan Employees are entitled to paid annual leave for every year of service: 20 days for one to three years of continuous service; 25 days for eight to (less than) fifteen years of continuous service; and 30 days for 15 or more years of service with the employer. Employees are also entitled to 12 paid public holidays.[163] 20 12 32
 Spain Workers are entitled to 22 working days of annual leave and 14 paid public holidays.[55][164] The public holidays on weekends are not moved to other day, like in UK, so the effective number is 11 for a 5-day workweek. 22 11 33
 Sri Lanka In practice, most of the religious and festival holidays are available with most jobs having 20 days paid leave and 20 public holidays. However shop and office employees are entitled to a minimum of 14 days of annual leave and are also entitled to 8 paid public holidays.[5][165] 20 20 40
 Sudan Workers are entitled to annual leave as follows: 20 days if a worker has been continuously employed by his employer for a period of one to three years; 25 days if a worker has spent eight years or less than 15 years of continuous service with his employer; 30 days if a worker has spent 15 or more years of continuous service with his employer.[7] 20
 Suriname 12 18 30
 Swaziland An employee is entitled to no less than two weeks of holiday for every 12 months of employment with an employer.[7] 10
 Sweden Employees are entitled to 25 work days of annual leave.[14] There are no legal provisions for pay on public holidays.[166] Although, common practice is that you get paid on public holidays as well. 25 9 34
  Switzerland Employees over 20 years of age are entitled to 4 weeks, under 20 are entitled to 5 weeks.[14] Employees are also entitled to depending on the canton 7–15 paid public holidays.[167][168] 20 7 27
 Syria Employees are entitled to one annual leave of twenty-four working days, with full pay, after 1 to 5 years of employment; twenty-one working days, after 5 to 10 years of employment; and thirty working days, after 10 or more years of employment or when they are over 50. Employees are also entitled to 13 paid public holidays.[28] 24 13 37
 Taiwan 3 days (half year to 1 year of employment), 7 days (1 year), 10 days (2 years), 14 days (3 to 4 years), 15 days (5 to 9 years), and one additional day per year until 30 days (10 years). 3-30 12 15-42
 Tanzania An employer is required to grant an employee at least 28 consecutive days of leave in respect of each 12-month period of employment, and such leave is inclusive of any public holiday that may fall within the period of leave.[7] Employees are also entitled to 17 paid public holidays.[169] 20 17 37
 Thailand Annual leave shall be for a period of not less than 6 working days following the employee's first year of employment. In subsequent years, the employer may fix the annual vacation at more than 6 working days for an employee. Employees are also entitled to 13 paid public holidays.[5][170][171] 6 13 19
 East Timor 12
 Togo Workers are entitled to two and a half days per month.[7] There are no legal provisions for pay on public holidays.[172] 22 0 22
 Tonga The Tongan government is working on legislation to provide for paid vacation time.[citation needed] 0
 Trinidad and Tobago All workers in general are entitled to 14 consecutive days holiday with pay at the expiration of each complete year.[11] Employees are also entitled to 14 paid public holidays.[173][174] 10 14 24
 Tunisia All workers who perform at least 1 month of work during the reference year are entitled to enjoy 1 day of leave per month with a total duration not exceeding 15 days, of which 12 will be working days. Workers are entitled to additional leave days as follows; 1 day yearly for every 5 years of work with the same employer to a maximum of 18 days.[7] Employees are also entitled to 6 paid public holidays.[175] 10 6 16
 Turkey 14 work days (Saturdays are counted as workdays) for 1–5 years, 20 work days for 6–15 years and 26 days for over 15 years seniority. There are a total of 14.5 paid public holidays, but if these holidays fall on Sundays or other off-days of a worker, they are not carried over to the next workday.[176] 12 14.5 26.5
 Uganda An employee, once in every calendar year, is entitled to a holiday with full pay at the rate of seven days in respect of each period of a continuous four months' service.[7] Employees are also entitled to 13 paid public holidays.[177][178] 15 13 28
 Ukraine Employees are entitled to 24 calendar days of paid annual leave (31 for persons under 18 years old),[179][180] 13 days of National Holidays[181] (moved to a next working day if overlap with Saturdays or Sundays[182]). 24 13 37
 United Arab Emirates The worker shall be entitled during every year of service an annual leave of no less than the following periods: Two days for each month should the period of service of the worker be of six months at least and a year at most; Thirty days for each year should the period of service of the worker exceed one year. Employees are also entitled to 10 paid public holidays.[28][183] 30 10 40
 United Kingdom Employees are entitled to 28 total working days (5.6 weeks) of annual leave. These often include public/bank holidays which otherwise would be unpaid. Many employers will offer more than 20 days of paid annual leave in addition to the recognised bank holidays. Paid time off can increase with years of service. For example, an employee might accrue one extra day for every 5 years of service up to a maximum of 30 days paid leave, exclusive of bank holidays. Some employers will allow staff to purchase or sell holiday, usually a maximum of 5 days. Part-time workers are entitled to the same amount of leave but this is calculated on a pro-rata basis.[184][185][186] 20 8-10 28
 United States There is no federal or state statutory minimum paid vacation or paid public holidays. Paid leave is at the discretion of the employers to its employees.[187][188] According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, 77% of private employers offer paid vacation to their employees; full-time employees earn on average 10 vacation days after one year of service.[189] Similarly, 77% of private employers give their employees paid time off during public holidays, on average 8 holidays per year.[189][190] Some employers offer no vacation at all.[191] The average number of paid vacation days offered by private employers is 10 days after 1 year of service, 14 days after 5 years, 17 days after 10 years, and 20 days after 20 years.[189][192] 0 0 0
 Uruguay All workers, in the private sector and civil servants, are entitled to at least 20 days of paid annual leave. Workers who have worked in the same company, are entitled to an additional day of leave for every four years of seniority. Employees are also entitled to 5 paid public holidays.[11][193] 20 5 25
 Uzbekistan 15
 Vanuatu Every employer shall grant to an employee who has been in continuous employment with the same employer for: (a) a period of 1 to 6 years - annual leave on full pay at the rate of 1.25 working days per month for each year of employment; or (b) a period of 7 to 19 years - annual leave on full pay at the rate of 1.75 working days per month for each year of employment.[5] There are no legal provisions for pay on public holidays.[194] 15 0 15
 Venezuela Workers are entitled to enjoy 15 days of paid annual leave in the first year plus one day for each year of service with the same employer up to a maximum of 15 extra days.[11] 15
 Vietnam Employees working in normal working conditions are entitled to 12 working days after every 12 months of employment. This entitlement increases by one additional day of leave for every five years of employment in an enterprise or with an employer. Employees are also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[5][195] 12 11 23
 Yemen Workers shall be entitled to leave of not less than 30 days with full pay for each year of effective service, to be calculated on the basis of at least two-and-a- half days for each month.[28] Employees are also entitled to 15 paid public holidays.[196] 22 15 37
 Zambia Employees are entitled to two days of paid holidays in respect of each period of one month's service. Employees are also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[7][197] 20 11 31
 Zimbabwe An employee is entitled to one twelfth of the employee's qualifying service in each year of employment, subject to a maximum accrual of ninety days of paid vacation leave. Employees are also entitled to 11 paid public holidays.[7][198] 22 11 33

See also

  • Annual leave
  • Long service leave
  • Parental leave
  • List of holidays by country

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  195. ^ "Wage Indicator" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 October 2016. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
  196. ^ "Wage Indicator" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2 March 2016. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
  197. ^ "Wage Indicator" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 28 October 2016. Retrieved 17 January 2019.
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External links

  • 6 people from around the world share what it's like to have nationally mandated work vacation. Business Insider. 16 October 2017
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_minimum_annual_leave_by_country&oldid=1059183624"
hr.wustl.edu

Vacation can be taken after the conclusion of the 6-month orientation period. After the 6-month orientation period, vacation accruals are available for use as of the end date of the pay period. Balances can carry over each fiscal year but cannot exceed a maximum accrual of 1.5 times the annual accrual (20 x 1.5 = 30; 22 x 1.5 = 33 days).

Effective July 1, 2019 (updated August 2021)

Vacation Accrual for Staff employees Hired, Rehired or Transferred into a benefits eligible role on or After July 1, 2019

Regular full-time and part-time benefits-eligible employees accrue vacation each fiscal year (July 1 through June 30) based on hours paid and years of service according to the following schedule:

Years of ServiceVacation DaysHourly Accrual RateAccrual Maximum
(1.5x annual accrual)
0 to 3 years20 days0.07730 days
Beginning of year 422 days0.08461533 days

Employees paid on a monthly basis accrue the same amount of vacation each month (unless on unpaid leave, see below). Two examples:

  1. An employee who is regularly scheduled to work 40 hours per week and eligible for 22 days of vacation will accrue 14.67 hours of vacation per month ((2,080 X 0.084615) ÷ 12)).
  2. An employee who is regularly scheduled to work 37.5 hours per week and eligible for 22 days of vacation will accrue 13.75 hours of vacation per month ((1,950 X 0.084615) ÷ 12)).

Employees paid on a bi-weekly basis accrue vacation based on actual hours paid during a month.

Part-time employees accrue vacation on a prorated basis. The maximum is based on their FTE percent. For example, if the employee’s FTE percent is 50%, then they are eligible for up to 50% of the full time accrual maximum (e.g. 10 days or 11 days depending on years of service). Full-time employees who transition to part-time status will have their vacation hour accruals as of the effective date of the change adjusted to the part-time FTE equivalent.

Hours paid on which vacation time accruals are calculated include regular, sick, Caregiver/Parental leave, vacation, holiday, funeral leave, and jury duty, but do not include overtime. Non-exempt employees do not accrue vacation time on more than 80 hours of pay in a pay period. Vacation does not accrue during unpaid time off or with respect to any Short-Term Medical Disability pay received from Unum. 

Vacation can be taken after the conclusion of the 6-month orientation period. After the 6-month orientation period, vacation accruals are available for use as of the end date of the pay period. Balances can carry over each fiscal year but cannot exceed a maximum accrual of 1.5 times the annual accrual (20 x 1.5 = 30; 22 x 1.5 = 33 days).

Employees who have completed 3 years of eligible service will move to the higher accrual rate on the payroll following the employee’s third service anniversary date. Prior years of service do not count for rehires.

Vacation Accrual for Staff employees Hired Prior to July 1, 2019

Regular, benefits-eligible employees hired prior to July 1, 2019 accrue vacation based on hours paid up to a maximum of 22 working days per fiscal year (July 1 through June 30). Vacation is accrued per hour paid (0.084615) and is available for use as of the end date of the pay period. Employees paid on a monthly basis accrue the same amount of vacation each month (unless on unpaid leave, see below). Two examples:

  1. An employee who is regularly scheduled to work 40 hours per week and eligible for 22 days of vacation will accrue 14.67 hours of vacation per month ((2,080 X 0.084615) ÷ 12)).
  2. An employee who is regularly scheduled to work 37.5 hours per week and eligible for 22 days of vacation will accrue 13.75 hours of vacation per month ((1,950 X 0.084615) ÷ 12)).

Employees paid on a bi-weekly basis accrue vacation based on actual hours paid during a month.

Balances can carry over each fiscal year but cannot exceed a maximum accrual of 1.5 times the annual accrual (22 x 1.5 = 33 days). 

Part-time employees accrue vacation on a prorated basis.  Full time employees who transition to part time status will have their vacation hour accruals as of the effective date of the change adjusted to the part time FTE equivalent.

Hours paid on which vacation time accruals are calculated include regular, sick, Caregiver/Parental leave, vacation, holiday, funeral leave, and jury duty, but do not include overtime. Non-exempt employees do not accrue vacation time on more than 80 hours of pay in a pay period. Vacation does not accrue during unpaid time off or with respect to any Short-Term Medical Disability pay received from Unum.

Scheduling of Vacation Time

The scheduling of vacation time, including any partial days, requires the prior approval of the employee’s supervisor.

A non-exempt employee cannot receive any benefit pay, other than holiday pay, for a week in excess of their normal standard hours. For example: a non-exempt employee regularly scheduled to work 40 hours per week cannot work overtime Monday through Thursday to reach 40 hours and then take 8 hours of vacation on Friday. However, if the employee only had one hour of overtime for the week and had 33 hours worked through Thursday, they could take 7 hours of vacation on Friday.

Schools and departments may have additional requirements. Partial days of vacation may be granted at the discretion of the supervisor. Generally, exempt employees are not required to use vacation time if their time away from work is less than 4 hours.

Payout of Unused Vacation

An employee with 6 or more months of continuous regular service whose employment is terminated for any reason will be paid for accrued unused vacation time up to the maximum accrual. Terminating employees may not use vacation in lieu of providing the required notice of their resignation.

An employee who becomes eligible to receive Long-term Disability benefits will be paid for accrued unused vacation time up to the maximum accrual.

An employee with 6 or more months of continuous regular service who moves to a non-benefits eligible role (e.g., part-time less than 20 hours per week) will be paid for accrued unused vacation time up to the maximum accrual.