Searching for: Bar closing time song

HowToTimes collects 20 results for "bar closing time song", updated recently.

Bar-Closing Songs, Ranked - MEL Magazine

16-01-2018 · You want a song that will bring patrons down smoothly and lovingly herds them toward the door. In that vein, here are the best bar-closing songs, ranked: 12. Journey, “Don’t Stop Believin’”. There was a brief — I repeat, brief — moment in 2005 when this song’s reemergence in the culture was fun.

16-01-2018

One night during my sophomore year of college, I came back to my small fraternity bedroom to find my dirtbag roommate hosting a random assortment of barflies, sorority girls and general layabouts he’d been out drinking with earlier that evening. (He didn’t tell me he was bringing people over, let alone ask. He never asked.)

Stone cold sober after a night of studying — this must have been one of those periods when I was dangerously close to flunking out, and in a fit of panic, decided to become studious for a short period of time — I was in no mood to entertain a bunch of drunks who wanted to use my room to smoke weed and listen to late-1990s gangster rap into the wee hours. (My roommate had very specific taste.) I needed some fucking sleep, man, but no one, least of all my roommate, would listen to my pleas for quiet.

Still, these people needed to leave, so I took the most extreme measure possible: I commandeered the music and played “Closing Time” (loudly). Like hogs to the slaughter, everyone in the room quickly and dutifully filed out of the room. I felt like a wizard.

Such is the power of the bar-closing song — the tune that a given bar plays every night at last call, and reminds patrons that while they don’t have to go home, they can’t, in fact, stay “here.”

Attend the same bar enough, and you’ll develop a Pavlovian relationship with its chosen closing song. Hear it and you mindlessly shuffle to the exit, refocusing on after-hours plans. And for people working at the bar, the bar-closing song is a welcome signal that their work is nearly done, and that soon these drunken assholes will be temporarily out of their lives.

Yet, despite what some people say, you don’t want to play a song that’s so repulsive that it causes people to flee like madmen. You want a song that will bring patrons down smoothly and lovingly herds them toward the door. In that vein, here are the best bar-closing songs, ranked:

12. Journey, “Don’t Stop Believin’”

There was a brief — I repeat, brief — moment in 2005 when this song’s reemergence in the culture was fun. The Chicago White Sox adopted the tune as their team anthem during their improbable World Series championship run that year, vaulting it back onto the charts 24 years after its release. A.J. Pierzynski, a man voted the most-hated player in Major League Baseball in 2012 by his peers, liked to sing Journey at karaoke, and it took off from there.

But more than a dozen years later, this song has once again been overplayed to the point that it’s been stripped of every ounce of nostalgic joy. Now every uninspired wedding DJ in the country thinks it’s a contractual requirement to play this song at least once during the reception. And to appease who? Wedding DJs are painfully unoriginal.

11. Neil Diamond, “Sweet Caroline”

This song will definitely help clear out any bar, as there’s nothing that makes me want to leave an area faster than hearing a group of people scream “So good! So good! So good!” in unison.

Neil Diamond sucks. He’s a wannabe Elvis who found a curious niche crooning schmaltzy lounge tunes that only 60-year-old divorcees enjoy. And he’s been dining out on “Sweet Caroline” for nearly 50 years now, and it’s all because of that gimmicky call-and-response in the chorus. People are such suckers.

10. Red Peters, “The Closing Song”

Apparently, this is a popular end of the night song in karaoke bars, proving once again karaoke is for tasteless dweebs.

9. Eddie Money, “Take Me Home Tonight”

Money’s drunk and horny plea to a woman to take him home because he’s sad and lonely strikes the ear as pathetic and manipulative, especially in the current social climate. It’s made all the stranger by the woman who coos “Be my little bay-bee” in the refrain. If she already wants Eddie to be her baby, why the fuck is he spending three and half minutes trying to convince her to shack up?

There is the off-chance that this song will come on at the end of the night, and you and the person you’ve been speaking to will sing it together, and the highly suggestive lyrics will convince you that yes, you should take each other home tonight. (Note: This will never happen.)

8. David Allen Coe, “You Never Even Called Me By My Name”

It only recently came to my attention that this is the de facto bar-closing song of many parts of the Deep South, and I understand why — it perfectly encapsulates the despair that sets in when last call is announced. The song’s narrator is so desperate for love, that he’s willing to go home with a woman who confuses him with other, more famous musicians. Too real.

7. Michael Jackson, “Will You Be There”

Better known as the theme to the kid-friendly, orca liberation propaganda film Free Willy, this Michael Jackson diddy is the best, feel-good bar sing-along that absolutely no one knows the words to. This late-career Jackson hit was one of the last truly pleasant memories we have of the former King of Pop and will have you leaving the bar on a high note. But be forewarned that you may have several sobbing millennials on your hands. That last scene in Free Willy — when the boy teaches the whale to jump to its freedom, and the rousing violin music swells in the background — really plucks at the heartstrings.

The whale [sniffles] he’s finally free! But now the boy is friendless again! Life is a cruel joke.

6. Willie Nelson, “The Party’s Over”

As you’ll notice, there are an abundance of country bar-closing songs, which makes sense since it tends to be the most literal of all music genres. Country songs convey their points directly and explicitly — an important quality when you’re trying to get a bar full of drunks to leave.

5. Garth Brooks, “Friends in Low Places”

This was the go-to bar-closing song for 80 percent of the campus bars I frequented as a freshman at the University of Illinois, and it was great. Brooks’ anthem about the joys of being unabashedly unrefined is good listening when you and your friends are blasted on the cheapest booze the world has to offer.

But then, all those same bars inexplicably stopped playing this song, almost as if in unison. I never heard it again, and the source for this collusion against Garth was never uncovered. (By the way, if someone tells you they like “everything but country,” tell them they’re a classist philistine.)

4. John Denver, “Take Me Home, Country Roads”

This peculiar choice for a bar-closing song comes to us from r/bartenders, the Reddit community for and by bartenders, but it’s an obvious choice, as it checks all the requisite boxes for a quality bar-close song:

  • It has a chorus everyone can sing to (“Country roads, take me home / To the place I belong”).
  • It’s about going home (the place you belong).
  • It mentions booze (moonshine).
  • And even it suggests a mode of transportation (country roads).

That’s really all you need to get you through that depressing transition from fun at the bar to a lonely Uber ride home.

3. Semisonic, “Closing Time”

Contrary to popular belief, this song isn’t written about drinking until bar close. Semisonic frontman Dan Wilson says he wrote the song about the birth of his first child. Normally, I hate it when artists tell me how to interpret their art — looking at you, Darren Aronofsky — but this gave me a newfound appreciation for the song. I thought “Closing Time” was a perfectly likeable post-grunge, pre-Coldplay arena rock ballad when I first heard it as an 11-year-old. But the song seemed hokey and overly literal as I got older. (The music video remains as great today as it was then, however, and serves as a relic of a bygone era when trying to meet someone out meant using a payphone to leave a message on their answering machine.)

Wilson’s explanation gives the song some much-needed heft, though. Knowing Wilson’s motivations, “Closing Time” reads as a man lamenting the end of his life as a hard-drinking young man and transitioning into fatherhood — and not a song about trying to convince some drunken stranger to go home with you.

Last year, Wilson released a cover of “Closing Time” that strips the song of the power chords and features only his voice and the piano part, and it’s absolutely lovely.

2. George Thorogood, “One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer”

It never occurred to me to use this song as a bar-closing song until I saw it suggested on this Reddit thread, but upon closer inspection, it’s genius. Thorogood’s cover of the blues-drinking epic is the ultimate ode to self-medicating with booze, which makes it ideal to kick off a night of focused inebriation. But it functions as a perfect closer, too. The song is eight minutes long, giving people ample warning to settle up before the bar indeed closes. Not to mention, it gives them just enough time to say fuck it and order one more shot for the road. Just hearing that riff makes me want to guzzle booze like Janis Joplin.

1. Lynyrd Skynyrd, “Tuesday’s Gone”

How this song came to be overshadowed by “Freebird” is truly baffling. Malcolm Gladwell could devote 500 pages and a dozen, bullshit social psychology theories to figuring it out.

Skynyrd’s fondness for the Confederate flag makes enjoying them a deeply problematic experience, but Dazed and Confused cemented “Tuesday’s Gone” as the ultimate end-of-the-party anthem. After all, the slide guitar sounds like how the last throes of a party feel.

And if a song can convince Wooderson to leave, then it’ll do just fine at your local haunt.

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The 105 Best Songs To Hear At 2 AM When The Bar Is Closing Up

17-03-2022 · When the clock strikes 2 a.m. at a bar, that’s when things tend to get real. It’s when the rubber hits the road, the chips fall and the dust settles and yes, it’s when all the cliches that are known to man make sense. The lights are all on and with it, the harsh reality that comes with fully ...

17-03-2022

Hardest-partying states in America and the hardest working states in the US.

  • 2 a.m. at a bar is perfect for the right kind of songs
  • This list features anthems, heart-string pullers, and dance your ass of songs
  • More cool stuff here

When the clock strikes 2 a.m. at a bar, that’s when things tend to get real. It’s when the rubber hits the road, the chips fall and the dust settles and yes, it’s when all the cliches that are known to man make sense. The lights are all on and with it, the harsh reality that comes with fully illuminated clarity.

But that time of day/night is also when some songs just hit perfectly. They call out to you, grabbing your attention, and regardless of what kind of nonsense you might be getting into, they force you to stop everything, cock your head back and start singing along. Whether or not you know all the words is something that is completely irrelevant. At this point, it’s all about effort, kid.

After doing extensive field research, consulting with experts, and then doing some more field research, the following list of the best songs for this specific time and place was compiled. Originally scribbled on a beer-soaked napkin, we now present it to you in a slightly more legible way.

We’re sure we left off some of your favorites. But here are ours.

The Ones Where We’re Singing To The Cheap Seats

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“Don’t Stop Believing” — Journey

“Living on a Prayer” — Bon Jovi

“Sweet Child O’Mine” — Guns N’ Roses

“Glory Days” — Bruce Springsteen

“We Are the Champions” — Queen

“Mr. Brightside” — The Killers

“Beautiful Day” — U2

“Free Falling” — Tom Petty

“Gin & Juice” — Snoop Dogg

“Bohemian Rhapsody” — Queen

“You Shook Me All Night Long” — AC/DC

“Born in the USA” — Bruce Springsteen

“Use Somebody” — Kings of Leon

“Welcome to the Jungle” — Guns N’ Roses

“All the Single Ladies” — Beyonce

“All the Small Things” — Blink 182

“Brown-Eyed Girl” — Van Morrisson

“Ants Marching” — Dave Matthews Band

“Closing Time” — Semisonic

“I Gotta Feeling” — Black Eyed Peas

“Sweet Caroline” — Neil Diamond

“Take Me Home Tonight” — Eddie Money

The Ones Where All That Matters Is The Chorus

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“Tiny Dancer” — Elton John

“Here I Go Again” — Whitesnake

“Fight for Your Right to Party” — Beastie Boys

“Country Roads” — John Denver

“Faith” — George Michael

“Josie” — The Outfield

“I Love Rock ‘n’ Roll” — Joan Jett

“Got My Mind Set on You” — George Harrison

“Sex is on Fire” — Kings of Leon

“Jessie’s Girl” — Rick Springfield

“Piano Man” — Billy Joel

“Empire State of Mind” — Jay-Z

“Let’s Get It Started” — Black Eyed Peas

“Hey! Baby” — Bruce Channel

“Any Way You Want It” — Journey

“Say It Ain’t So” — Weezer

“Hotel California” — The Eagles

“Rock You Like a Hurricane” — Scorpions

“I’ll be Missing You” — Puff Daddy

“Freebird” — Lynyrd Skynyrd

“Party in the USA” — Miley Cyrus

“Mr. Jones” — Counting Crows

“You Can Call Me Al” — Paul Simon

“She Will Be Loved” — Maroon 5

“California Girls” — David Lee Roth

“Jeremy” — Pearl Jam

“Sunday Bloody Sunday” — U2

“Sweet Emotion” — Aerosmith

“Let my Love Open the Door” — Pete Townshend

“Never Let You Go” — Third Eye Blind

“Teenage Wasteland” — The Who

“Shout” — Tears for Fears

“Somebody to Love” — Queen

The Ones Where You Know Almost All The Words

most iconic music moments 2010s

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“Wagon Wheel” — Darius Rucker

“Piano Man” — Billy Joel

“Billie Jean” — Michael Jackson

“Sweet Home Alabama” — Lynyrd Skynyrd

“Semi-Charmed Life” — Third Eye Blind

“Ring of Fire” — Johnny Cash

“Apple Bottom Jeans” – TPain

“All Summer Long” — Kid Rock

“Mo Money Mo Problems” — Notorious B.I.G.

“Vertigo” — U2

“Crazy Bitch” — Buckcherry

The Ones Where You Know Barely Any Words But Who Cares, Right?

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“Dancing in the Dark” — Bruce Springsteen

“Juicy” — Notorious B.I.G.

“Cotton-Eyed Joe” — Rednex

“Hit Me With Your Best Shot” — Pat Benatar

“99 Red Balloons” — NENA

“Tik Tok” — Ke$ha

“Hey Jealousy” — Gin Blossoms

“Sunglasses at Night” — TIGA

“Heat of the Moment” — Asia

“Are You Gonna Be My Girl” — Jet

“Viva La Vida” — Coldplay

The Ones Where Gender Need Not Apply

Katy Perry Accused Of Sexual Assault By Model In Teenage Dream Video

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“Girls Just Want to Have Fun” — Cyndi Lauper

“Kissed a Girl” — Katy Perry

The Ones Where We Hug During It

jack johnson singer legacy

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“Chasing Cars” — Snow Patrol

“Somewhere Over the Rainbow” — Israel “IZ” Kamakawiwoʻole

“I’m Yours” — Jason Mraz

“Love Story” — Taylor Swift

“Somewhere Only We Know” — Keane

“Heart” — Alone

“Better Together” — Jack Johnson

The Ones Where We Need Room To Dance

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“I Want to Dance with Somebody” — Whitney Houston

“ABC” — Jackson 5

“Shots” — LMFAO

“Just Dance” — Lady Gaga

“Forever” — Chris Brown

“Rude Boy” — Rihanna

“OMG” — Usher

“Peaches ‘n’ Cream” — 112

“Ignition” — R. Kelly

“The Thong Song” — Cisco

“Please Don’t Stop the Music” — Rihanna

“Airplanes” — B.o.B.

“Don’t Cha” — Pussy Cat Dolls

“Damaged” — Danity Kane

“Sexy Chick” — David Guetta ft. Akon

“Party Up” — DMX

“Grace Kelly” — Mika

“Yeah” — Usher

“Blame it on the Alcahol” — Jamie Fox

11points.com

The lead singer of Semisonic says he wrote the song as a metaphor for childbirth. A line-by-line examination into the lyrics must be done. In 1998, a song called Closing Time came out as the debut single from a band called Semisonic. The song featured lyrics (ostensibly) about a lonely person’s experience during last call at a bar.

The lead singer of Semisonic says he wrote the song as a metaphor for childbirth. A line-by-line examination into the lyrics must be done.

In 1998, a song called Closing Time came out as the debut single from a band called Semisonic. The song featured lyrics (ostensibly) about a lonely person’s experience during last call at a bar. It would be Semisonic’s only hit — but what a hit. Closing Time was immediately and permanently the go-to song for the end of the night at bars, weddings, bar mitzvahs, parties, quinceaneras and Semisonic concerts.

But here’s the thing. No one reazlied Semisonic had a little of that Robert Frost mojo in them.

It turns out the entire song was actually a metaphor for childbirth.

Semisonic’s lead singer, Dan Wilson, explained during a performance at his 25th reunion at Harvard…

Millions and millions of people bought the song and heard the song and didn’t get it. They think it’s about being bounced from a bar but it’s about being bounced from the womb.

So let’s go line-by-line through Closing Time and try to interpret it in its alternative context.

Closing time, open all the doors and let you out into the world

Doors = the vagina. We’re off to a smashing start.

Closing time, turn all of the lights on over every boy and every girl

The “boy/girl” stuff makes more sense now. And I guess this line refers to hospital lights? Unless it’s a metaphor on top of a metaphor and is referring to the beginning of human consciousness or something.

Closing time, one last call for alcohol so finish your whiskey or beer

Gee, wonder why people thought this was really about a bar? Is whisky and beer like one last quick suck of nutrients from the umbilical cord?

Closing time, you don’t have to go home but you can’t stay here.

So this is quite definitively the child being bounced from the womb.

I know who I want to take me home / I know who I want to take me home / I know who I want to take me home / Take me home

The baby wants his parents to take him home? This feels a little insecure, like Dan Wilson was worried his baby might’ve rejected him for one of the guys from Better Than Ezra.

Closing time, time for you to go out to the places you will be from

Logical. Makes more context in the childbirth sense than the bar sense actually.

Closing time, this room won’t be open till your brothers or your sisters come

Makes way more sense. The womb wasn’t available until the other siblings got out of there. Although I’m not sure that this line is really spectacular in the bar OR pregnancy contexts.

So gather up your jackets

Placenta?

Move it to the exits

There’s that vagina talk again.

I hope you have found a friend.

Makes sense for twins, perhaps? Otherwise I’m not sure this works in the macro picture.

Closing time, every new beginning comes from some other beginning’s end.

Sure thing, makes sense, pregnancy ends, life begins, lightning crashes.

And from here on, it’s just the chorus a few more times and a few repeated lines. Verdict: It really might be about childbirth, with a few serious red herrings thrown in.

Next week: Perhaps I can examine whether the Counting Crows’ Mr. Jones is secretly about the Nancy Kerrigan’s knee.

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Meaning of “Closing Time” by Semisonic

30-10-2018 · “Closing Time” proved to be the only song by Semisonic that became a hit in America. Yet despite its success, it was never released as a single in America. “Closing Time” was so successful that it peaked at number 1 on the modern rock hits in 1998. Till date it is Semisonic’s only song to have achieved that feat.

30-10-2018

by SMF · Published · Updated

“Closing Time”, a song by rock group Semisonic, lyrically is about encouraging patrons to vacate a bar as it is about to end its operations for the night. The literal meaning of this song revolves around bar patrons being advised its ‘closing time’ and acting accordingly, but the more-profound interpretation is based around, as Dan Wilson puts it, “being born and coming into the world”. Wilson unconsciously wrote it about his daughter Corazon (also known as Coco), who was then still in her mother’s womb.

Semisonic’s drummer also confirmed that Wilson penned the lyrics in partial recognition of fatherhood, which he was experiencing for the first time while this song was being composed.

Lyrics of Closing Time

Despite being released decades ago, this song still remains a regular selection in bars to this day. In addition to this, it has been featured on a number of television shows and movies, in addition to being a stadium favorite of the Milwaukee Brewers professional baseball team. Learn more about this extraordinary track by reading interesting details below:

“Closing Time” Facts

  • Semisonic’s lead singer, Dan Wilson wrote this track. Production was handled by English record producer Nick Launay. Over the course of his illustrious career, Launay gained fame for working with the likes of Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, Kate Bush and Arcade Fire.
  • “Closing Time” was released in March of 1998. It was the first single from the band’s second studio album titled Feeling Strangely Fine. That album was also released in March of 1998.
  • The proverb “every new beginning comes from some other beginning’s end” that is featured at the end of the track actually was authored by a 1stcentury Roman philosopher named Seneca the Younger.
  • The music video for this song was produced by Chris Applebaum. The video features a split screen with action centered around Dan Wilson on one side. On the other side is the actress named Denise Franco. Denise portrays Wilson’s girlfriend in the video.
  • Dan Wilson did a solo version of this song on his 2017 album Re-Covered.
  • “This classic was a massive chart success. It charted in a number of countries, including the United States and Canada.
  • “Closing Time” proved to be the only song by Semisonic that became a hit in America. Yet despite its success, it was never released as a single in America.
  • “Closing Time” was so successful that it peaked at number 1 on the modern rock hits in 1998. Till date it is Semisonic’s only song to have achieved that feat.
  • Dan Wilson says that he wrote this hit song in only 20 minutes.

Did “Closing Time” win a Grammy Award?

No. However, it received a Grammy nomination in the category of the Best Rock Song at the 41st Annual Grammy Awards in 1999. It lost the award to Alanis Morissette’s “Uninvited”.

Tags: Closing TimeMeaning of "Closing Time" by SemisonicSemisonic

The best drinking, pub and last-call songs

31-03-2020 · Many believe everything is better with alcohol...especially those who just turned 21. The same can be said for music. What happens when we mix the two?

31-03-2020

Many believe everything is better with alcohol...especially those who just turned 21. The same can be said for music.

What happens when we mix the two? Something to celebrate usually while out with friends. Tip back a few and sing as loud as you can when your favorite party song or tune about beer comes on, whether at a bar, house or tailgate.

As we approach St. Patrick's Day, where everybody is Irish, what better time to look at some of the top songs to sing, dance or just sulk to in a corner while nursing your cocktail?

 

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The video for the versatile Foxx's 2009 hit is loaded with star cameos and remains a club favorite. It also won a Grammy and blames every type of booze around for making those bad decisions during a night out. It also has its place on the house party scene, especially when cranked loud in your parents' tiny living room so the neighbors can feel the vibration and call the cops. 

 

Donna Ward/Getty Images

The tune is over 35 years old but a staple at bars in the Midwest, specifically the greater Milwaukee area. If you've been there, you've probably heard this Femmes classic often. At some point in their lives, middle-aged folks have shaken their heads or air drummed to this catchy number made more special by Gordon Gano's beautifully whining voice. 

 

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The Beastie's ode to a cocktail that's part rum, vodka and orange juice was a hit in 1987 and still pops up at clubs. It's an easy song to let loose to and even better to try out the dance the Boys rap about while you're half in the bag. If you have that castle in Brooklyn, you can even pour it on your face, but we don't recommend it.

 

Sergione Infuso/Corbis via Getty Images

This is arguably Rihanna's greatest party song and one that tends to bring the ladies onto the dance floor at clubs, corner bars or sorority formals. In a way, it's also a celebration of girl power — the old "work hard, play hard" message while doing it responsibly. So "everybody putcha glasses up, let the Jameson sink in" and have a good time.

 

Frank Micelotta/Getty Images

There are no hidden messages or innuendoes in the lyrics. The song is about what you think — heading out of a bar after last call, preferably with someone special, or available, by your side...perhaps just for the night. The song is quite schlocky but actually went to No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart and earned the Minneapolis band a Grammy nomination for Best Rock Song in 1999. 

 

Richard E. Aaron/Redferns/Getty Images

Looking for the definition of a rock anthem, this is it. It was a smash for Journey in the early 1980s and has enjoyed a resurgence as a sing-along favorite over the last decade-plus. It's a jukebox staple at dive bars and neighborhood pubs while also quite popular at sporting events (thank you, Chicago White Sox). It's for every small-town girl who's living in a lonely world and looking for her city boy from South Detroit.

 

Richard E. Aaron/Redferns/Getty Images

It's another song that's made a resurgence thanks to its use in movies ("Guardians of the Galaxy") and TV ("The Goldbergs"). It was a No. 1 hit for the British-born Holmes and made this sweet, tropical drink fashionable in the late 1970s and into the 1980s...even though it was only just a feature in his story song about a personal ad. Just be careful if you're drinking one when caught in the rain.

 

Paul Natkin/WireImage/Getty Images

Is this the most popular country song of all time? There's a good chance, but its mainstream appeal can't be denied. It really does not matter which type of bar — country, honky tonk, Dave & Busters — to this day Brooks' anthem is still relevant and can get the crowd hollering the night away. 

 

Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images

No mainstream hip-hop, rap piece celebrates West Coast urban life better than the second cut off Snoop's debut. It's also quite humorous watching suburban kids in bars or house parties groove to a song — that offers plenty of funk under Snoop's lyrics and D-Ruff's memorable chorus — and then get sick from too much of the drink.

 

Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images

Talk about staying power. Expect this one to get a lot of play this weekend at bars, house parties or backyards — if the weather is warm. While the original band members were from Los Angeles, the group has always catered to Irish-American fans due to its Shamrocks and Shenanigans persona. Make sure the floors are sturdy and the ceiling is high enough when listening. Also, playing this song has become a longtime tradition at University of Wisconsin football games. 

 

Mark Horton/Getty Images

The Boston punk outfit has enjoyed some mainstream success over the last decade, but this is a true favorite of Murphys fans and was once a staple of the group's live shows. It's the story of an alcohol-dependent blowhard looking for love who eventually comes clean with himself. It is as entertaining as it it fun to sing along with. It's possible to hear at pubs, even outside Southie, come bar time.

 

Mark Weiss/Getty Images

Whether at a bar, dance, wedding or bar mitzvah, the 1986 hit for the Jersey rockers has become a timeless classic, simply for the inviting "woah-oh." That usually makes people of all ages and generations stop what they are doing and chime in at the top of their lungs. It's even better when the bar turns the sound down, uniting all in a "woah-oh" that fills the room. Even today's underage youth has a way to relate to the song with a little help from SpongeBob SquarePants.

 

Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Capital Concerts Inc.

Is this the official theme song of the Florida Keys? According to legend, Buffett wrote it in Austin, Texas. Pretty much any bar in a warm-weather climate will play this at least once a day. It's still a favorite with the middle-aged and Baby Boomer crowd and has even led to a chain of restaurants under the same name. 

 

Isaiah Trickey/FilmMagic/Getty Images

Johnny Lee Hooker's 1996 version is good, but the Delaware destroyer's take on this hard-luck, yet comical, story song is the one that has become a dive-bar staple. No matter how much life can get you down or how little money is jingling in your pocket, things seem much better when we belly up for one of each.

 

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Tweens and millennials still can't get enough of this catchy 2009 Miley hit. Those of age, or others not but out of sight of their parents, continue to throw their hands up while trying not to spill any of their drinks. But it doesn't matter. Everybody is having a good time, and as long as you are celebrating responsibly, it's OK to get wasted on this pop anthem.

 

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Considered by most to be Joel's signature song, it's a last-call staple that's perfect to sing along to while putting an arm around your buddy and swaying back and forth. It's also quite the experience to see it played live, with lighters — make that cell phones — out in full force while 20,000-70,000 fans sing in unison "to forget about life for a while."

 

Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The perfect tribute to house parties, tailgates and barbecues, Keith's 2011 hit has become an anthem to the weekend drinker across the country because it's totally relatable. Anybody who has taken more than a few sips of alcohol in his or her life has probably done so at some point from this bright, plastic wonder. Just make sure you put your name on it so nobody mistakes it as his or her own. 

 

Lynn Goldsmith/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images

This early Police classic is one you likely won't hear regularly at bars and has nothing to do with booze. That being said, it makes for one entertaining drinking game. Liberties can be taken with the rules, but the gist is to take a sip of your drink with your right hand every time the band says "Roxanne" or "red," and take a swig with your left every time your hear "light." If you're looking to get sauced fast, this is your game.

 

John Parra/WireImage/Getty Images

The boys from LMFAO and Lil Jon are literally challenging us to get drunk. More often than not, many will take them up on the offer. This club hit is usually played when it's time to turn things up a little bit and, of course, help the bar make money with a run on shots. If you are not sure which shot to order, the song is like a menu to help with the decision.

 

Jim Rogash/Getty Images

Whether it's at karaoke, last call or during the middle of the eighth inning at Fenway, there really is no better sing-a-long tune than this Neil Diamond offering...simply because it's a great song on its own. The all-together "bah, bah, bah" and added "so good, so good" is a celebration and tradition within a song that's spanned generations.

 

Joseph Okpako/Getty Images

The true meaning of Lamar's conceptual gem touches on broken families, fitting in and alcoholism. However, the beat makes it a club standout, and everybody seems more than happy to "dive in" that pool of liquor. It's somewhat of a cautionary and disturbing tale, but when you're buzzed and dancing, nobody is really paying attention.

 

Christopher Polk/Getty Images for iHeartMedia

Kesha's first single in 2009, back when she was all about the $, is still a dance-club favorite, perfect for grinding while holding your drink high in the air. In fact, it seems almost pointless not to be drinking while enjoying the dance/electro-pop masterpiece that has the ability for some long-lasting staying power. 

 

Scott Gries/Getty Images

Showing some love to the good people of St. Louis, J-Kwon is another artist inviting us all to have a good time at the club but maybe not get completely blitzed. It's easy to work with on the dance floor and has been featured in a number of films. It also translates well to the house party crowd if funds are low.

 

Martyn Goodacre/Getty Images

The struggling British band, at the time, didn't intend for its only mainstream hit from 1997 to be a favorite for those who fancy "a whiskey drink" or a "vodka drink." But it was gold among bros and frat boys who hopped around to it and would draw needless attention to themselves — in the U.S. It also became somewhat of a favorite of international football fans and is still good for some nostalgia while sipping a "lager drink" or a "cider drink."

 

hoto by Gems/Redferns/Getty Images

"Freebird" or "Sweet Home Alabama" also work as quality late-night bar favorites, but this unheralded gem off the Skynyrd's stellar 1973 debut "Pronounced 'Lĕh-'nérd 'Skin-'nérd," has earned a bit of cult status thanks to the 1993 stoner classic "Dazed and Confused." In the movie, as the famed party at the moon tower winds down, the kegs go dry and a fight spoils the mood, "Tuesday's Gone" plays over. It's a beautiful classic rock song about moving on.

Songs that signal closing time... - Pop Rock Nation

23-04-2013 · This song brings more to mind barflies than restaurant patrons, but the sentiment is the same. Lyle Lovett also has a song called “Closing Time”, though its mood isn’t nearly as much fun as Semisonic’s. Lyle Lovett’s “Closing Time” is a gentle ballad, …

23-04-2013
Time to go home?

Time to go home?

When I was younger, I had a series of jobs that required me to work evenings. One job I had was working at a men’s clothing outlet, where I usually worked until closing time. Invariably, people would show up a few minutes before closing time to do their shopping. As I tried to get things straightened up for the end of the day, they would leisurely shop for pleated pants and matching sweaters, oblivious to my desire to call it a night.

Years later, I took a job waiting tables, where we’d have people show up a few minutes before closing time for late night noshing or perhaps a scrumptious dessert. Unlike a lot of my peers, I was less concerned about making an extra tip or two than I was about getting home. I seem to have been born without the business gene. Actually, those late night diners usually weren’t so bad. Many of them realized they were showing up late and we were about to close. But every once in awhile, there would be a lovestruck couple who would sit in the Garden Room of our restaurant and gaze passionately at each other while S-L-O-W-L-Y sipping their wine. They were oblivious to all the people they were holding up with their extended date. We’d stand around, side work all done, waiting for these people to pay their check. One couple was particularly clueless and our chef actually turned the lights down on them to give them a strong hint that it was time to GTFO.

Anyway, the other day I was sitting at my desk, listening to the 11,000 plus songs on my iPod, when a song from the late 1990s popped up. It was a song by Semisonic called “Closing Time”. I remembered it was played on the very last episode of the original incarnation of Melrose Place, a trashy 90s era primetime soap that I was hooked on back in the day.

The lyrics took me back to those many evening nights I waited for people to finish up and hit the road. This song brings more to mind barflies than restaurant patrons, but the sentiment is the same.

Lyle Lovett also has a song called “Closing Time”, though its mood isn’t nearly as much fun as Semisonic’s. Lyle Lovett’s “Closing Time” is a gentle ballad, with acoustic guitar and piano and Lovett’s sweet tenor. His song is more about a musician saying goodnight to an appreciative crowd and his roadies.

Speaking of appreciative songs for roadies, how about Jackson Browne’s “The Load Out”?

This is a great song to end a night to… whether you’re at one of Jackson Browne’s shows or trying to close up a restaurant.

While I’ve never heard Supertramp’s “Goodbye Stranger” used as a closing song, it occurs to me that it might make a good one, though I’ve always suspected this song was really about Supertramp’s Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson becoming increasingly annoyed with each other to the point of the band’s breakup.

Back in the early 90s, when I’d frequent karaoke night at a bar near my college, the karaoke jockey would signal the end of the evening by playing the theme song for Rawhide. I always thought that was pretty clever, since it got the point across without resorting to anything offensive. On the other hand, I don’t have any issues with using profanity if it’s effective. Another karaoke jockey I knew introduced me to Red Peters’ brand of comedy with this song…

The first time I heard this song, I about peed in my pants laughing. I can’t tell you how many times I had these very same thoughts running through my mind as I took care of the last stragglers sitting in my station. There’s a good reason why I don’t wait tables anymore. But I can still laugh at the memories and anyone who has spent an evening dealing with drunks or overly demanding people can relate.

If you want to be elegant about calling it a night, you could always play “Time To Say Goodbye” by Sarah Brightman and Andrea Boccelli, otherwise known as “Con te partirò”.

Personally, I’m partial to the way Red Peters does it, even at his live shows. As a side note, I once played this at a party I threw because I wanted a couple of guests to hear it. They took it as a hint that I wanted them to leave. Luckily, they later forgave me. Be very careful how you use “The Closing Song”!

And with that, I bid you adieu until my next post…

7 Songs To End A Party (Because At Some Point, You …

The party was a success! All of your closest friends showed up, only two people got obnoxiously drunk, and a few lucky couples made out with each other on your roommate's bed! The thing is, you're…

The party was a success! All of your closest friends showed up, only two people got obnoxiously drunk, and a few lucky couples made out with each other on your roommate's bed! The thing is, you're getting tired, your neighbor keeps knocking on the door to complain about all the noise, and one of those obnoxious drunks just started vomiting in your backyard. You don't want to just yell at everybody to get out, but you have to make it clear that it's time to go: you need a song to end this party. Fortunately for you, I have a few recommendations for songs that will gently thank your guests for attending... while simultaneously letting them know their presence is no longer desired.

Will a song, on its own, make your guests vacate? No, but it will provide a soothing, on-message soundtrack as you walk around to each person, thanking them for coming and forcefully bidding them adieu. All you have to do is shake their hand, hold eye contact, nod your head, and politely say, "Oh, thank you SO much for coming! When can I see you again?" If they ask, "Oh, is the party over?" simply respond with, "Yeah, unfortunately, but how about that exit music, huh?" Then, slowly, take their drinks, walk them towards the exit, and let the music smooth out any social awkwardness that might have otherwise occurred.

On that note, here are seven songs to help you end your epic rager:

"Thank You For The Music" — ABBA

For some reason, this song actually sounds like ABBA saying goodbye to their fans... although I don't think that was their intent. In any case, it'll do the trick.

"Epilogue/Do You Hear The People Sing?" — Les Miserables Soundtrack

Hey, if it can close out a musical as epic as Les Mis , it'll be a fitting finale for your little party.

"I Will Remember You" — Sarah McLachlan

If you play this, you can actually just walk around the party singing along and people will get the hint.

"Get Out Of My House" — Kate Bush

People will be so confused by what's going on in this song that they won't want to be in your home anymore, anyway. It works!

"So Long, Farewell" — The Sound of Music

People will think it's so cute, they won't notice that you're literally pushing them out the front door.

"The Party's Over" — Peggy Lee

Peggy Lee may mean it as a metaphor for a broken relationship, but don't worry — people will pick up on the message behind the song, which is "get out of my house right now."

"Closing Time" — Semisonic

I mean, obviously. If you want to mix it up, however, just sing the song a cappella at the top of your lungs, and marvel at how quickly the room clears out.

When Is Last Call in all 50 States

In Tallahassee, bars can stay open until 4 a.m. as long as they aren’t selling alcohol past 2 a.m. Clubs in Miami can serve alcohol until 5 a.m., Fort Lauderdale bars can serve until 4 a.m., and ...

Depending where you are in the United States, you may or may not be able to party all night and into the early morning hours. The ringing yell of a bartender warning of last call comes at 12 a.m. in some states, 4 a.m. in others, and never comes for bartenders in a few states. While most of the country lives by the adage that nothing good happens after 2 a.m., some hard-partying locales try to beat the odds and prove that just because something is a saying doesn’t mean it’s true.

Here is when bars are required to close in each state, as well as the major cities with late-night exceptions.

Alabama: 2 a.m.

While 2 a.m. is the general closing time in Alabama, 25 of 67 counties in the state are dry with only a few cities that sell alcohol. Licensed clubs—bars that require a (usually easy to get) membership—can stay open later, with one Birmingham bar called The Nick keeping drinks flowing until 6 a.m.

Alaska: 5 a.m.
Alaska’s closing law is true for every day except election days, when the state tries to keep people on the sober side. All of Alaska’s larger cities have moved the time up to 2 a.m. or 3 a.m., but many small communities haven’t.

Arizona: 2 a.m.

Drinks can’t be served after 2 a.m., and by 2:30 a.m., no one can touch any of the drinks they haven’t finished yet.

Arkansas: 2 a.m.

Clubs that have a members registry can stay open until as late as 5 a.m. Thirty-five of the state’s 75 counties are dry, and some wet counties have dry cities.

California: 2 a.m.

In San Jose, the last drink is served at 1:30 a.m., although bars aren’t required to close until 3 a.m. A bill in 2017 to let individual cities decide to move last call up to 4 a.m. was shot down.

Colorado: 2 a.m.

A bill in 2017 to let individual cities decide when bars must close failed to pass, leaving Colorado’s closing time at 2 a.m.

Connecticut: 2 a.m. Friday and Saturday nights, 1 a.m. Sunday through Thursday.

But on New Year’s Eve, bars can stay open until 3 a.m.

Delaware: 1 a.m.

Bars can stay open until 2 a.m., giving people time to finish up any last drinks, but no drinks can be served during the last hour.

Florida: 2 a.m.

In Tallahassee, bars can stay open until 4 a.m. as long as they aren’t selling alcohol past 2 a.m. Clubs in Miami can serve alcohol until 5 a.m., Fort Lauderdale bars can serve until 4 a.m., and Tampa bars can stay open until 3 a.m.

Georgia: 2 a.m.

Georgia lacks a statewide law for closing time, but most counties require bars to close at 2 a.m., though Atlanta bars close at 2:30 a.m,

Hawaii: 2 a.m.

A limited number of clubs in Waikiki can serve alcohol until 4 a.m.

Idaho: 2 a.m.

The larger cities like Boise follow the 2 a.m. guideline, but many smaller cities require bars close at 1 a.m.

Illinois: 2 a.m.

The state doesn’t have a set bar closing time, but the latest most counties allow sales is 2 a.m. In Chicago, bars with late night licenses can sell until 4 a.m. Sunday through Friday, and until 5 a.m. Saturday.

Indiana: 3 a.m.

Iowa: 2 a.m.

Kansas: 2 a.m.

Eight counties in Kansas don’t allow liquor sales at bars if a person doesn’t have a club membership.

Kentucky: 2 a.m.

In Louisville, some bars have licenses to sell until 4 a.m.

Louisiana: None

Bars in cities like New Orleans can serve alcohol for 24 hours without a special license. Some parishes in the state have set a limit, however, and in Baton Rouge last call is at 2 a.m.

Maine: 1 a.m.

Bars can close at 2 a.m. on New Year’s Eve. There’s also a 15 minute consumption period from the time the bars close that the location must be vacated.

Maryland: 2 a.m.

However, in Baltimore on New Year’s Eve, bars can stay open from the morning of December 31 to 2 a.m. on January 2.

Massachusetts: 2 a.m.

Many cities require bars to close at 1 a.m. Boston allows closing at 2 a.m., but the last drink must be served 30 minutes prior to closing time.

Michigan: 2 a.m.

Minnesota: 2 a.m.

Mississippi: 12 a.m.

Cities in Clay county can say open until 2 a.m., and most casinos, including those in Biloxi, can sell alcohol 24 hours a day.

Missouri: 1:30 a.m.

Some bars in St. Louis and Kansas City can sell until 3 a.m. with a special license.

Montana: 2 a.m.

Nebraska: 1 a.m.

Omaha and Lincoln allow bars to sell until 2 a.m.

Nevada: None

New Hampshire: 1 a.m.

New Jersey: 2 a.m.

There’s no statewide law, but most cities require bars to close at 2 a.m. Atlantic City serves alcohol 24 hours a day.

New Mexico: 2 a.m.

New York: 2 a.m.

In New York City, Buffalo, Albany and Saratoga Springs, bars can stay open until 4 a.m.

North Carolina: 2 a.m.

North Dakota: 1 a.m.

Fargo and some other municipalities allow bars to remain open until 2 a.m.

Ohio: 2 a.m.

Some bars with special licenses in larger cities like Columbus can remain open until 2:30 a.m.

Oklahoma: 2 a.m.

Twenty-six of Oklahoma’s 77 counties are dry and don’t allow the sale of alcohol.

Oregon: 2:30 a.m.

Pennsylvania: 2 a.m.

Clubs with memberships can remain open until 3 a.m.

Rhode Island: 1 a.m.

On Friday and Saturday nights in Providence, bars can stay open until 2 a.m.

South Carolina: 2 a.m.

South Carolina allows counties to set the time, but most are around 2 a.m. No alcohol sales are allowed on Sundays except in Aiken City, Columbia, Charleston, Greenville, North Augusta, Spartanburg and Myrtle Beach.

South Dakota: 2 a.m.

Tennessee: 3 a.m.

Fourteen counties in Tennessee are dry and don’t allow alcohol sales.

Texas: 2 a.m.

Utah: 1 a.m.

Vermont: 2 a.m.

But bars can sell until 3 a.m. on New Year’s Eve.

Virginia: 2 a.m.

When Daylight Saving Time ends, bars must close the first time the clock hits 2 a.m.

Washington: 2 a.m.

West Virginia: 2 a.m.

Club licenses in cities like Charleston allow bars to stay open until 3 a.m.

Wisconsin: 2 a.m.

On Friday and Saturday nights, bars can serve until 2:30 a.m. There’s also no required closing time on New Year’s Eve.

Wyoming: 2 a.m.

Awesomely Bad Closing Time Songs

Do not bust these songs out too early.

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There's a certain flavor of song you can only listen to 10 minutes before the bar's about to kick you out, when anything goes, and you're totally emotionally open to a tune that's way too happy, way too bouncy, or just way too amazingly dumb. If that song comes on at 9pm, everyone will stare at the ground in shame. If that song comes on at 1:50am, or 3:50am, or whatever last call is in your town, everyone will get so pumped up from singing along that they won't want the night to end, and you'll end up inviting them back to your house for an impromptu after-party featuring nothing on the stereo but "Ignition (Remix)" -- which is actually a very good song you won't find on the list below.

Two men yelling
Andy Pixel/Flickr

If Enrique Iglesias were to describe himself in three words, they would be “sincere, sincere, sincere.” He means what he sings, more than anyone has ever meant anything. But you know what? Whatever your personal musical tastes are at noon, right now, you’re sympatico with him -- because you’re fully prepared to be the hero to everyone in this bar. By inviting them over to your place for beverages. It’s so wonderful, you might start crying.

Normally you are way too cool to express this level of naked emotion to your friends, but right now -- at that critical juncture when “closing time” could easily turn into “opening time at my apartment!” -- it just feels so right to sing this crazy nonsense while pogoing and putting everyone you know into a headlock of love. 

Shirtless men dancing
Andy Pixel/Flickr

This song could not be more ‘90s if it were fighting with Ticketmaster. But at least it’s happy ‘90s! Sort of. The lyrics might actually be depressing. Who knows? Who cares! Doo doo doo, doo doo-doo doo!
 

Why in the name of all that is holy would you sing along to this PSA about not forgetting your jacket at any other time than Closing Time? And why wouldn’t you sing along to it now? Come on, guy, you’re being less fun than this song is at noon on a Tuesday.

Friends singing together
Andy Pixel/Flickr

At any other time, this song might have you saying, “This song is so overplayed; this bar is totally unoriginal and lame.” As 4am (in some lucky cities!) starts to feel like it might be too early to call it a night, all you care about is totally nailing this harmony. 

Mr. Boombastic’s ode to hubris and shaky morals is a fine opportunity to showcase those miming, dancing and rapping skills that show up just before the Uber does. The Shaggy Defense also affords you the right to do dumb stuff ‘til morning with complete impunity: “It wasn’t me!” Dude, there are photos.

Tattooed man singing
Andy Pixel/Flickr

Germanic New Age rainforest pop filled with bizarre yodeling and lyrics that’d make a fortune cookie blush is rarely called for… but it is called for right now! Tomorrow, it will sound like a shampoo advert again, but there’s no shame in feeling it now. Well, a little shame.

There’s a time for this level of unabashed sincerity. Actually two times -- the ‘80s, when all these wildly talented people were actually trying to save the world; and on this dance floor, with 100 close friends, all of whom you couldn’t love more right now if even they were made of bacon.

Close up of man singing or yelling
Andy Pixel/Flickr

All day, every day, all Will Smith has to worry about is bustin’ moves and saying the right amount of “nah nah nahs.” 99.9% of the week that would piss you off! But at 2am on a party night? This is the go-to for 3:48 seconds of unapologetically dumb group joyfulness.

This song is the perfect metaphor for what’s happening: the Earth (the bar) is about to become extinct (close for the night) so you need to rally everyone to go to Venus (your place, or maybe your buddy Kevin’s place, which is nicer). “We’re leaving together, but still it’s farewell…” -- it truly is the perfect perfectly stupid song to belt out at the top of your lungs just before McSwiggins shuts out the lights.


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Closing Time (Semisonic song)

27-11-2021 · "Closing Time" is a song by American rock band Semisonic. It was released on March 10, 1998, as the lead single from their second studio album, Feeling Strangely Fine, and began to receive mainstream radio airplay on April 27, 1998.The ballad was written by Dan Wilson and produced by Nick Launay.. The single reached number one on the US Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart …

27-11-2021
1998 single by Semisonic
1998 single by Semisonic
Closing Time single.jpg"Closing Time"Single by Semisonicfrom the album Feeling Strangely FineReleasedMarch 10, 1998 (1998-03-10)Genre
  • Alternative rock[1]
  • post-grunge[2]
  • power pop[3]
  • pop rock[4]
Length
  • 4:33 (album version)
  • 3:49 (single version)
LabelMCASongwriter(s)Dan WilsonProducer(s)Nick LaunaySemisonic singles chronology
"F.N.T."
(1996)
"Closing Time"
(1998)
"Singing in My Sleep"
(1998)
Audio sample
  • file
  • help
Music video"Closing Time" on YouTube

"Closing Time" is a song by American rock band Semisonic. It was released on March 10, 1998, as the lead single from their second studio album, Feeling Strangely Fine, and began to receive mainstream radio airplay on April 27, 1998. The ballad[5] was written by Dan Wilson and produced by Nick Launay.

The single reached number one on the US Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart and the top 50 in Australia, Ireland, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. It is certified silver in the latter country and was nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Rock Song in 1999.[6][7] The song reappeared on the charts of three countries in 2011 after being featured in the 2011 movie Friends with Benefits and an episode of television sitcom The Office;[8][9] it attained its highest chart peaks in Australia and Ireland during this period.

While the song is about people leaving a bar at closing time (also called last call), and widely interpreted as such, drummer Jacob Slichter has also indicated that the song was written by Wilson "in anticipation of fatherhood" and that it is about "being sent forth from the womb as if by a bouncer clearing out a bar".[10][11]

Background and writing

Prior to the composition "Closing Time", Semisonic would usually end their concerts with the song "If I Run". The band grew tired of playing this song every night and so Wilson set out to write a new song that they could play at the end of their set.[12] Wilson's girlfriend was pregnant at the time and although Wilson did not set out consciously to write a song about giving birth, he has stated that "Part way into the writing of the song, I realized it was also about being born."[12]

The song ends with a quote attributed to Roman Stoic philosopher Seneca: "Every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end."

Music video

The music video was directed by Chris Applebaum.[13] It features two continuous shots, running side by side on the screen. One side shows the band playing the song in a rehearsal space. The other side features a woman (played by Denise Franco) as the singer Dan Wilson's girlfriend. As the video progresses, Dan and his girlfriend switch sides of screen, as they attempt to meet up. At the end of the video, they both wind up at the same nightclub. However, they still end up missing each other by mere seconds and never meet. The "trick" of the video is that each shot was done as one long, continuous shot, with no cuts or editing, and therefore relies on proper timing to get the two sides of the video lined up properly.

Critical reception

Larry Flick of Billboard magazine described "Closing Time" as an "instantly memorable rock ditty", saying, "...the core of 'Closing Time' is pure pop with a sticky chorus that will have you singing along before the end of your first listen. This could be the jam that establishes Semisonic as the top 40 heroes they deserve to be."[14] Doug Reece of the same magazine called the song "impossibly hooky".[15] "Closing Time" was placed at number 19 on Rolling Stone's 2007 list of the "20 Most Annoying Songs".[16]

Track listings

US promo CD[17]

  1. "Closing Time" (pop mix) – 3:52
  2. "Closing Time" (acoustic mix) – 3:52
  3. "Closing Time" (Clearmountain Mix) – 3:49

European CD single (released March 10, 1998)[18]

  1. "Closing Time" (Clearmountain Mix) – 3:49
  2. "Delicious" – 3:58
  3. "Gone to the Movies" – 3:52
  4. "Closing Time" (album version) – 4:35

UK CD single[19]

  1. "Closing Time" – 3:49
  2. "Delicious" – 3:53
  3. "Made to Last" – 5:02

UK cassette single[20]

A. "Closing Time" (remix edit) – 3:49
B. "Air That I Breathe" – 4:21

Charts and certifications

Chart (1998–1999) Peak
position
Australia (ARIA)[18] 50
Canada Rock/Alternative (RPM)[21] 2
Netherlands (Single Top 100)[22] 84
New Zealand (Recorded Music NZ)[23] 50
Scotland (OCC)[24] 17
UK Singles (OCC)[25] 25
US Radio Songs (Billboard)[26] 11
US Adult Alternative Songs (Billboard)[27] 4
US Adult Top 40 (Billboard)[28] 4
US Alternative Airplay (Billboard)[29] 1
US Mainstream Rock (Billboard)[30] 13
US Mainstream Top 40 (Billboard)[31] 8
Chart (2011) Peak
position
Australia (ARIA)[18] 40
Ireland (IRMA)[32] 48
UK Singles (OCC)[33] 76
Chart (2012) Peak
position
UK Singles (OCC)[34] 71
Chart (1998) Position
Canada Top Singles (RPM)[35] 33
Canada Rock/Alternative (RPM)[36] 15
Region Certification Certified units/sales
United Kingdom (BPI)[37] Silver 200,000double-dagger

double-dagger Sales streaming figures based on certification alone.

Release history

Region Date Format(s) Label(s) Ref.
United States February 23, 1998 (1998-02-23)
  • Mainstream rock
  • modern rock
  • triple A radio
MCA [38]
March 10, 1998 (1998-03-10) CD [citation needed]
April 27, 1998 (1998-04-27) Top 40 radio [39]
United Kingdom October 25, 1999 (1999-10-25)
  • CD
  • cassette
[40]

See also

  • Number one modern rock hits of 1998

References

  1. ^ Price, Walter (January 7, 2019). "A Take Me Home Three-Way: SEMISONIC – "Closing Time" (1998)". Global Texan Chronicles. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  2. ^ "Classical Cover: Semisonic's Closing Time". Alto Riot.
  3. ^ "Dan Wilson On Mountain Stage". NPR. October 29, 2014. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  4. ^ Mitchell, Collin (April 5, 2001). "Semisonic All About Chemistry MCA". Daily Nexus. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  5. ^ Verna, Paul (March 28, 1998). "Reviews & Previews – Albums". Billboard. Vol. 110 no. 13. p. 55.
  6. ^ "41st Grammy Awards – 1999". Rock on the Net. Retrieved February 12, 2007.
  7. ^ Wood, Olivia (January 15, 2020). "Episode 176: Semisonic". Song Exploder. Retrieved February 13, 2020.
  8. ^ Hyden, Steven (November 30, 2011). "We Are All 'Closing Time': Why Semisonic's 1998 Hit Still Resonates". Grantland. Retrieved March 16, 2021.
  9. ^ Halperin, Shirley (December 7, 2010). "Semisonic revists "Closing Time" thanks to movie". Reuters. Retrieved March 16, 2021.
  10. ^ A Hit Single and the Heart-Wrenching Story Behind it, by Claudia Ricci, The Huffington Post, posted February 8, 2011, retrieved February 27, 2011
  11. ^ "Perennial Co-Writer Returns With An Album Of His Own". NPR.org. April 15, 2014.
  12. ^ a b Schlansky, Evan (October 14, 2019). "Semisonic Success Story: An Interview with Dan Wilson". American Songwriter. Retrieved January 10, 2020.
  13. ^ "Production Notes". Billboard. Vol. 110 no. 19. May 9, 1998. p. 80.
  14. ^ Flick, Larry (February 21, 1998). "Reviews & Previews – Singles". Billboard. Vol. 110 no. 8. p. 64.
  15. ^ Reece, Doug (April 4, 1998). "Popular Uprisings". Billboard. Vol. 110 no. 14. p. 12.
  16. ^ "The 20 Most Annoying Songs". Rolling Stone. July 2, 2007. Archived from the original on July 5, 2007.
  17. ^ Closing Time (US promo CD disc notes). Semisonic. MCA Records. 1998. 9765.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  18. ^ a b c "Semisonic – Closing Time". ARIA Top 50 Singles.
  19. ^ Closing Time (UK CD single liner notes). Semisonic. MCA Records. 1998. MCSTD 48098.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  20. ^ Closing Time (UK cassette single sleeve). Semisonic. MCA Records. 1999. MCSc 40221, 155 645-4.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  21. ^ "Top RPM Rock/Alternative Tracks: Issue 3543." RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved January 31, 2019.
  22. ^ "Semisonic – Closing Time" (in Dutch). Single Top 100.
  23. ^ "Semisonic – Closing Time". Top 40 Singles.
  24. ^ "Official Scottish Singles Sales Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company.
  25. ^ "Official Singles Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company.
  26. ^ "Semisonic Chart History (Radio Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved January 31, 2019.
  27. ^ "Semisonic Chart History (Adult Alternative Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved January 31, 2019.
  28. ^ "Semisonic Chart History (Adult Pop Songs)". Billboard.
  29. ^ "Semisonic Chart History (Alternative Airplay)". Billboard.
  30. ^ "Semisonic Chart History (Mainstream Rock)". Billboard.
  31. ^ "Semisonic Chart History (Pop Songs)". Billboard.
  32. ^ "The Irish Charts – Search Results – Semisonic". Irish Singles Chart. Retrieved January 15, 2020.
  33. ^ "Official Singles Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company.
  34. ^ "Official Singles Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company.
  35. ^ "RPM's Top 100 Hit Tracks of '98" (PDF). RPM. Vol. 63 no. 12. December 14, 1998. p. 20. Retrieved March 23, 2019.
  36. ^ "RPM's Top 50 Alternative Tracks of '98". RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved January 31, 2019.
  37. ^ "British single certifications – Semisonic – Closing Time". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved October 2, 2020.
  38. ^ Bell, Carrie (February 21, 1998). "Semisonic's 'Feeling Fine' on MCA Set". Billboard. Vol. 110 no. 8. p. 17.
  39. ^ Reece, Doug (May 9, 1998). "MCA's Semisonic Strikes a Chord with 'Closing Time'". Billboard. Vol. 110 no. 19. p. 93.
  40. ^ "New Releases – For Week Starting 25 October, 1999: Singles". Music Week. October 23, 1999. p. 31.

External links

  • "Closing Time" on Song Exploder
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Closing_Time_(Semisonic_song)&oldid=1057465385"
12 Songs That Make Everyone In The Bar Go Wild

"The song" is just as effective whether you're ready to dance on top of the bar or fall asleep under it. In fact, it's best served in a bar full of tank top clad people who are out at 12 a.m. on a ...

We've all been there — you're in a bar, the mood is what you can best describe as "meh," your friends are either too drunk, not drunk enough, or talking to other people that aren't you (traitors) and you're left sitting there like a total loser. It also doesn't help that you're nursing a poorly mixed drink that tastes a whole lot more like anguish than a vodka cranberry. Your head rests in your clammy palm and your sleeve is getting wet from the drink condensation and you look about as happy to be alive as Kristen Stewart. It's a rough night — that is, until it happens.

Your song comes on.

No, not your fave song at the moment or the one you like to wax poetic about once you've had one too many glasses of Riesling. This song is the one that makes you, a poor man's Eeyore, and the rest of the downtrodden bar come to LIFE. The song that is a unifier, the one that gets everyone to passionately belt out with wild hand gestures, regardless of culture, gender, or creed.

Of course, "the song" doesn't always have to be the remedy to a bad day or poor night out. "The song" is just as effective whether you're ready to dance on top of the bar or fall asleep under it. In fact, it's best served in a bar full of tank top clad people who are out at 12 a.m. on a Tuesday simply because it's summer and that's something to celebrate. Because for real, the humidity and bad hair days will forever reign over gray skies, biting wind, and that nuisance from the sky we call snow.

So here are just a few of the songs that make strangers in bars cling onto each other like Jack and Rose on that frigid-ass raft (well, like, before she pushes him off...):

THE ULTIMATE "I DON'T CARE WHO YOU ARE, HUG ME" BAR SING-A-LONG: "DON'T STOP BELIEVING" BY JOURNEY

*Pumps fists to the sky*

Note: The Glee Cast version is also an acceptable substitute.

THE "I'M SO GLAD YOU'RE AS ANGSTY AS I AM RIGHT NOW": "JUMPER" BY THIRD EYE BLIND

THE "I'M ENOUGH DRINKS IN TO PRETEND LIKE I LIKE COUNTRY MUSIC": "WAGON WHEEL" BY DARIUS RUCKER

WAIT... Hootie sings this?! ALRIGHTTTTTT.

THE "OMG I LOVE THIS SONG BUT ONLY KNOW THE FIRST FIVE WORDS": "JUICY" BY NOTORIOUS B.I.G.

Yeah, yeah, so there are people who know the whole thing. But that's what lip-syncing is for, okay?

THE "IT FEELS A WHOLE LOT LIKE MIDDLE SCHOOL UP IN THIS BITCH": "TIPSY" BY J-KWON

ERRRRRRRRBODY IN THIS CLUB IS MOST DEFINITELY FEELING TIPSY IN ORDER TO ENJOY THIS.

THE "NO, I CAN'T REMEMBER THE PREAMBLE TO THE CONSTITUTION BUT YOU BET YOUR ASS I KNOW EVERY DOTTED I AND CROSSED T IN THIS SONG": "BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY" QUEEN

I'm fairly certain that this is the song that can inspire world peace.

THE "ARE YOU SURE HUMANITY DIDN'T PEAK IN 1986?": "LIVIN' ON A PRAYER" BON JOVI

Woaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh-oooooooaaaahhhhhhhhh.

THE "SURE I'M AN ANIMAL WHEN THIS SONG IS ON BUT I WILL SLOWLY RETREAT BACK TO MY CORNER ONCE IT'S OVER": "CAKE" BY RIHANNA

You finish dancing and slowly remove your leg from its perch on the bar. *Looks to left* Shock. *Looks to right* Awe.

THE "MAYBE IT'S NOT ME BUT AT LEAST ONE PERSON IN THIS BAR HAS BEEN BROKEN UP WITH TONIGHT": "SEVENTY TIMES SEVEN" BY BRAND NEW

Nothing, and I mean nothing, will ever delight my once-adolescent soul more than the passionate way a group of adults can bond over their emo phase.

THE "DON'T LOOK AT ME LIKE THAT, YOU'RE CRYING TOO": "BIG GIRLS DON'T CRY" BY FERGIE

I've actually been in a bar where the entirety of the establishment sang along, including the bar keep. It was a religious experience, one that cleanses the soul and renews hope.

THE "OMG YASSS! WAIT, WHY AM I SINGING THIS?": "BABY GOT BACK" BY SIR MIX-A-LOT

Fear not, Sir. We don't want none of your anaconda, either.

THE "AND IN THIS MOMENT, I SWEAR I AM BEYONCE": "SINGLE LADIES (PUT A RING ON IT)" BEYONCE

Wait, what's that? You're not single? That's funny, because when this song is on you ARE.

Leonard Cohen - Closing Time Lyrics

General CommentThis song is about closing time at a bar, and the end of the world: The whole damn place goes crazy twice And it's once for the devil and once for Christ But the Boss don't like these dizzy heights We're busted in the blinding lights, Busted in the blinding lights Of Closing Time There is a reference to revelations, where everybody goes crazy for the anti-christ, then the second ...

Ah we're drinking and we're dancing And the band is really happening And the Johnny Walker wisdom running high And my very sweet companion She's the angel of compassion She's rubbing half the world against her thigh And every drinker every dancer Lifts a happy face to thank her The fiddler fiddles something so sublime All the women tear their blouses off And the men they dance on the polka-dots And it's partner found, it's partner lost And it's hell to pay when the fiddler stops It's closing time (Closing time) (Closing time) (Closing time) Yeah the women tear their blouses off And the men they dance on the polka-dots And it's partner found, it's partner lost And it's hell to pay when the fiddler stops It's closing time Ah we're lonely, we're romantic And the cider's laced with acid And the holy spirit's crying, where's the beef? And the moon is swimming naked And the summer night is fragrant With a mighty expectation of relief So we struggle and we stagger Down the snakes and up the ladder To the tower where the blessed hours chime And I swear it happened just like this A sigh, a cry, a hungry kiss The gates of love they budged an inch I can't say much has happened since But closing time (Closing time) (Closing time) (Closing time) I swear it happened just like this A sigh, a cry, a hungry kiss The gates of love they budged an inch I can't say much has happened since (I can't say much has happened since) We're closing time Closing time I loved you for your beauty But that doesn't make a fool of me You were in it for your beauty too And I loved you for your body There's a voice that sounds like god to me Declaring, (declaring) declaring,declaring that your body's really you And I loved you when our love was blessed And I love you now there's nothing left But sorrow and a sense of overtime And I missed you since the place got wrecked And I just don't care what happens next Looks like freedom but it feels like death It's something in between, I guess It's closing time (Closing time) (Closing time) (Closing time) Yeah I missed you since the place got wrecked By the winds of change and the weeds of sex Looks like freedom but it feels like death It's something in between, I guess It's closing time Yeah we're drinking and we're dancing But there's nothing really happening And the place is dead as heaven on a Saturday night And my very close companion Gets me fumbling gets me laughing She's a hundred but she's wearing Something tight And I lift my glass to the awful truth Which you can't reveal to the ears of youth Except to say it isn't worth a dime And the whole damn place goes crazy twice And it's once for the devil and once for Christ But the boss don't like these dizzy heights We're busted in the blinding lights Of closing time (Closing time) (Closing time) (Closing time) The whole damn place goes crazy twice And it's once for the devil and once for Christ But the boss don't like these dizzy heights We're busted in the blinding lights (Busted in the blinding lights) Busted in the blinding lights Of closing time Closing time Oh the women tear their blouses off And the men they dance on the polka-dots It's closing time And it's partner found, it's partner lost And it's hell to pay when the fiddler stops It's closing time I swear it happened just like this A sigh, a cry, a hungry kiss It's closing time (closing time) (Closing time) (Closing time) (Closing time) The gates of love they budged an inch I can't say much has happened since But closing time (closing time, closing time, closing time) I loved you when our love was blessed I love you now there's nothing left But closing time I miss you since the place got wrecked By the winds of change and the weeds of sex

Lyrics submitted by bambi3k, edited by Click57

Closing Time Lyrics as written by Leonard Cohen

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

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Closing Time — Semisonic

"Closing Time" is a song by Semisonic from their 1998 album Feeling Strangely Fine. The band's most popular song, it was written by Dan Wilson and produced by Nick Launay. According to the Closing Time Songfacts, this remains a popular song at bars when they are ready to pack it up.

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Closing Time - Tom Waits | Songs, Reviews, Credits

Closing Time. Tom Waits ' debut album is a minor-key masterpiece filled with songs of late-night loneliness. Within his chosen narrow range of the cocktail bar pianistics and muttered vocals, Waits and producer Jerry Yester manage to deliver a surprisingly broad collection of styles, from the jazzy "Virginia Avenue" to the uptempo off-kilter ...

Tom Waits' debut album is a minor-key masterpiece filled with songs of late-night loneliness. Within his chosen narrow range of the cocktail bar pianistics and muttered vocals, Waits and producer Jerry Yester manage to deliver a surprisingly broad collection of styles, from the jazzy "Virginia Avenue" to the uptempo off-kilter funkiness of "Ice Cream Man." The acoustic guitar folkiness of the tender "I Hope That I Don't Fall in Love with You" is an upside-down take on the Laurel Canyon sound, while the saloon song "Midnight Lullaby" would have been a perfect addition to the repertoires of Frank Sinatra and/or Tony Bennett. Waits' entire musical approach is highly stylized and, in its lesser moments, somewhat derivative of some of his own heroes: "Lonely" borrows from Randy Newman's "I Think It's Going to Rain Today." His lovelorn lyrics can be sentimental without penetrating too deeply, but they still get the job done since these are song portraits in miniature. The frameworks of most of the songs come from the songwriter's literary obsessions with Charles Bukowski and Jack Kerouac. Waits also has a gift for gentle, rolling pop melodies; his original scenarios are strikingly visual on the best songs, such as "Martha" -- which Yester discreetly augments with strings -- and the now iconic "Ol' 55." Waits' original version is far superior in conveying the early-morning emotions after leaving a lover's room to the Eagles' hooky hit cover -- which ultimately guaranteed Waits an income for life. Closing Time quietly announces the arrival of a talented songwriter whose self-consciousness, wry barroom humor, and solitary melancholy made him a standout from virtually all of his peers, and difficult to pigeonhole.

What's California's New 4 AM Closing Time For Bars Means ...

08-06-2017 · The state of California has finally shed some of its nightclub nerd mentality and passed a law that allows bars to stay open until 4 a.m. Previously it was 2 a.m., which was really like 1:30 considering chairs had to be up and people out the door by 2.

08-06-2017
Standing Room Hermosa Beach CA bars
People are having a great time in a California bar.

The state of California has finally shed some of its nightclub nerd mentality and passed a law that allows bars to stay open until 4 a.m.

Previously it was 2 a.m., which was really like 1:30 considering chairs had to be up and people out the door by 2.

But what does this mean for your city or the city or town you are visiting while traveling in Cali? Well, it all depends on that city.

You see, while the state has passed this as law, the actual implementation is up to individual cities. So one could stay open until 4 (or 3) while others may stick with 2.

In PubClub.com’s home base of Hermosa Beach the city council would close the bars at 11 if they had their druthers.

Also, the bars don’t have to stay open any later than they want to, so if they choose to close at 2 (or later or even earlier) it’s up to them.

So the impact could be huge in some places. Clubs in places like Hollywood, the clubs in downtown LA, San Francisco and San Diego’s Gaslamp will be pushing their cities to adopt the later closing time. Some other places, such as Carmel and Monterey, are happy to roll up the sidewalks at 2.

You could, of course, e-mail your city council members (get their addresses from the official city website) to tell them if you want your town to have the bars open later. Some might even make it a point of discussion at a city council meeting.

Also, talk to your bar managers, owners, bartenders and servers and ask them what you can do in order to extend their hours.

It’s PubClub’s opinion that a closing time of 2 a.m., is just too early. Particular in the major cities of Los Angeles/Hollywood, San Francisco and San Diego, especially considering other major worldwide cities such as New York, Barcelona and Berlin are open until at least 4.

What do YOU think? Let us know by leaving a comment!

Semisonic - Closing Time Lyrics

Closing time Open all the doors and let you out into the world Closing time Turn all of the lights on over every boy and every girl Closing time One last call for alcohol, so finish your whiskey or beer Closing time You don't have to go home, but you can't stay here I know who I want to take me home I know who I want to take me home I know who I want to take me home Take me home Closing time ...

Closing time Open all the doors and let you out into the world Closing time Turn all of the lights on over every boy and every girl Closing time One last call for alcohol, so finish your whiskey or beer Closing time You don't have to go home, but you can't stay here I know who I want to take me home I know who I want to take me home I know who I want to take me home Take me home Closing time Time for you to go out to the places you will be from Closing time This room won't be open 'til your brothers or your sisters come So gather up your jackets, move it to the exits I hope you have found a friend Closing time Every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end, yeah I know who I want to take me home I know who I want to take me home I know who I want to take me home Take me home Closing time Time for you to go out to the places you will be from I know who I want to take me home I know who I want to take me home I know who I want to take me home Take me home I know who I want to take me home I know who I want to take me home I know who I want to take me home Take me home Closing time Every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end

Lyrics submitted by Nuklear

Closing Time Lyrics as written by Dan Wilson

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group, Warner Chappell Music, Inc.

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Semisonic's Song "Closing Time" Has a Pro-Life Meaning No ...

31-03-2015 · Remember the Grammy-winning ‘90s song, “Closing Time,” by Semisonic? Until recently, no one really knew what the song was actually about – although we all thought we knew. The song was about a bar’s last call for the night, and what might ensue once the bar-goers left… right? Surprisingly, no. Even more surprising is the song’s Pro-Life […]

31-03-2015

Remember the Grammy-winning ‘90s song, “Closing Time,” by Semisonic?  Until recently, no one really knew what the song was actually about – although we all thought we knew.

The song was about a bar’s last call for the night, and what might ensue once the bar-goers left… right?  Surprisingly, no.

Even more surprising is the song’s Pro-Life message.

Dan Wilson, the band’s lead singer, revealed the song’s meaning at his 25th reunion at his alma mater, Harvard.  Wilson explains to his fellow alumni that when he and his wife were expecting their daughter, he didn’t want to write a cliché song to commemorate the occasion:

[Bandmates] instinctively know that as soon as junior arrives on the scene, the next thing that’s going to come is a song about junior, written by the singer, guaranteed to be that singer’s favorite song he or she ever wrote…

It gets personal because when my wife Diane and I were expecting our one and only child, I knew this. I knew that my bandmates… were feeling that dread.  So I did what any good sneak would do, and I hid my junior song, and I did it in plain view, which is where a good sneak knows is the best place to hide something. And I hid it so well in plain view that millions and millions of people heard the song and bought the song and didn’t get it.  They think it’s about being bounced from a bar, but it’s about being bounced from the womb.

Listen to Wilson explain the real meaning behind each verse of the song, beginning about 4 ½ minutes into the video. Then, watch the song itself.

semisonic

50 greatest album-closing songs of all time

05-08-2015 · The best album ending songs of all-time from Nirvana, The Beatles, Radiohead, Rolling Stones, U2, Bruce Springsteen, Notorious B.I.G. and more.

05-08-2015
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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

One of the hardest things to do in music is go out on a high note. But these 50 artists and songs – among some of the greatest of all-time – managed to finish to do it in spectacular fashion.

Being a great album-closer isn’t just about quality. It’s also about how the song sums up everything that came before it. Here are the records that did it best.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

50. Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers - 'American Girl'

Tom Petty’s debut album wasn’t a massive success upon its initial release in 1976. But after a few months, someone got the brilliant idea to release the album’s fantastic closer as a single, which, like the album, grew over time. “American Girl” still stands as one of Petty and the Heartbreakers’ peak moments.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

49. Kendrick Lamar - 'HiiiPoWer'

The final song on Kendrick Lamar’s debut album marks the arrival of hip-hop’s most compelling, current voice. As an album, “Section.80” isn’t perfect. But it’s final track finds Lamar reaching his full potential, combining wordplay and a social consciousness that would foreshadow amazing things to come.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

48. System of a Down - 'Aerials'

System of a Down’s second album, “Toxicity,” was a massive mainstream success highlighted by its intensity. But the most impactful song is its most melodic. “Aerials” blends thick instrumentation with Serj Tankian’s chilling voice. He appears on the verge of insanity, as does the track, all the way through its final haunting notes.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

47. Pavement - 'Fillmore Jive'

“Filmore Jive” is an incredible way to close “Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain.” The song’s dense guitar riffs were beyond anything other rock bands was doing during the mid-1990s and the song features arguably Stephen Malkmus’ best vocal performance. The closing onslaught is as mesmerizing a three-minutes as there is in indie-rock.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

46. Jimmy Eat World - '23'

When you ask Jimmy Eat World fans about their favorite song, don’t be surprised when big anthems like “Sweetness” and “The Middle” get passed by in favor of “23.” The beautiful closer to the band’s fifth studio album, “Futures,” finds Jimmy Eat World going in full power-pop mode for more than seven minutes, in the process crafting one of the best emo songs of the 2000s.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

45. Chemical Brothers - 'The Private Psychedelic Reel'

Ending an electronica album can be a difficult task, given the exhausting nature of the music. But The Chemical Brothers got everything else right about their second album, “Dig Your Own Hole.” So why not end it on a stunning note with the 9-minute “The Private Psychedelic Reel,” which seems like something out of a space odyssey.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

44. Brand New - 'Play Crack the Sky'

Jeff Lacey originally wrote the songs for Brand New’s second album, “Deja Entendu,” on acoustic guitar before being turned into post-hardcore anthems. Perhaps that’s why the gut-wrenching acoustic closer continues to resonate with fans. The song finds Lacey at his most raw, singing about a shipwreck that might as well be a broken heart.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

43. Rage Against The Machine - 'Freedom'

It can be somewhat hard to distinguish any track from Rage Against the Machine’s debut album, because they’re all so powerful. The album’s brilliance lies in the fact that every song breathes with fire. And it’s further testament to the band’s talent (and perhaps anger) that they remain defiant until the very end, concluding things with the snarky and biting “Freedom.” Welcome to the revolution.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

42. Arcade Fire - 'In the Backseat'

Despite “Funeral,” Arcade Fire’s critically acclaimed debut album, being a concept album, the final track, “In the Backseat,” seems from a different world. Win Butler’s voice is absent, clearing the way for Regine Chassagne’s softer melodies, which ends the darkness. It’s the case of ending on a high note, but figuratively and literally.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

41. Nas - 'It Ain't Hard to Tell'

Hip-hop albums are notoriously hard to end. They’re usually frontloaded to deal with short attention spans. Yet, Nas didn’t’ have that problem. “Illmatic” was just 10-tracks long, allowing it to end with its most pop-savvy tune. “It Ain’t Hard To Tell” is a song that perfectly sums up Nas’ storytelling ability and makes excellent use of a Michael Jackson sample to finish arguably the greatest rap album ever made.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

40. Iron Maiden - 'Hallowed Be Thy Name'

“Hallowed Be Thy Name,” the end track from the epic “The Number of The Beast” album, is not only one of Iron Maiden’s best songs, it’s one of the greatest metal tracks of all-time, period. The epic 7-plus minute track instantly became a mainstay at live shows and has been covered by numerous artists, including Dream Theater and Machine Head.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

39. Roy Orbison - 'Running Scared'

Few artists of the early 1960s had the guts and talent to write a potential hit song that didn’t have a chorus. Yet, Orbison’s amazing voice is able to carry “Running Scared,” the end song from his 1962 album “Crying.” The song builds into a soaring power ballad done in a slow-tempo, Latin style that other musicians would quickly latch onto.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

38. Red Hot Chili Peppers - 'Road Trippin'

You’d be hard pressed to find a more personal track by the Red Hot Chili Peppers about their journey as a band. The song, which is entirely acoustic and doesn’t feature drums, documents the band members’ surfing trip after guitarist John Frusciante rejoined the Chili Peppers. It’s the sound of a band (and a group of friends) coming back together.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

37. Jeff Buckley - 'Dream Brother'

Jeff Buckley is lauded as one of the greatest artists of his time, despite only having one proper studio album. So you know that’s one heck of a studio album with one hell of a closer. “Dream Brother” brings “Grace” to its conclusion with an impressive array of vocals and drums that fade into Buckley’s haunting voice.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

36. Arctic Monkeys - 'A Certain Romance'

During the mid-2000s, Arctic Monkeys became one of the most hyped British bands of all-time and had to make an impact with its 2006 debut album. Interestingly, the band saved perhaps its best track, “A Certain Romance,” for the end of “Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not.” It left fans wanting more thanks to a blissful barrage of indie-rock that brilliantly infused elements of garage, ska and punk.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

35. Metallica - 'The Call of Ktulu'

You won’t hear any words on the final track to Metallica’s classic metal album “Ride the Lighting.” The forceful “The Call of Ktulu” is the first time the bandmembers had all played on an instrumental track together. It worked out. The song earned a Grammy for Best Rock Instrumental Performance.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

34. Pixies - 'Gouge Away'

Everything you like about the Pixies is here, from the hypnotic bass and drum lines to Black Francis’ forceful vocals and those sharp guitar riffs. “Doolitle” was the indie rock album (released at the end of the 1980s) that helped shape the next decade of rock songwriters. “Gouge Away” was the track that left the impactful, lasting impression.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

33. Elliott Smith - 'Say Yes'

What’s interesting about the closing track to Elliot Smith’s “Either/Or” is that “Say Yes” is one of the few Smith tracks to offer a true sense of optimism. The iconic inside singer/songwriter was full of pain, but “Say Yes” became one of Smith’s most popular songs because it was fueled by his love for someone.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

32. Notorious B.I.G. - 'You're Nobody (Til Somebody Kills You)'

Notorious B.I.G.’s monumental douple-album “Life After Death” wasn’t short on tracks that unintentionally foreshadowed his death. But the fact the album ends with “You’re Nobody (Til Somebody Kills You),” is truly haunting. Still, the song’s lyrical brilliance serves as a worthy end-point on Biggie’s legacy. He was somebody long before his death.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

31. Weezer - 'Only In Dreams'

Rivers Cuomo has gone on record as saying “Only In Dreams” contains his favorite Weezer guitar solo. It’s hard to argue with him. While Weezer’s self-titled debut album is loaded with hits (“Buddy Holly,” “Say It Ain’t So”), the closing tracks finds Cuomo and company reaching new heights.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

30. Dire Straits - 'Brothers In Arms'

Since the release of “Brothers in Arms” in 1985, the title track and closing song from Dire Straits monumental album has become a blueprint on how to end properly end an album. The seven-minute track’s builds to a stunning conclusion, a style that has been mimicked by some of the best bands in the world. Just listen to U2’s “Love Is Blindness” from “Achtung Baby” (which almost made this list).

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

29. ACDC - 'Whole Lotta Rosie'

The closing song to AC/DC’s “Let There Be Rock” is testament to just how amazing the late Bon Scott was. Scott’s fierce and swaggering voice engulfs the track, meshing perfectly with Angus Young’s simple, but forceful riffs. It’s the final note on one of the most important rock albums of the 1970s.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

28. U2 - '40'

U2 is no stranger to great album closers. But the band’s best comes from 1983’s “War.” The song, which features one of Bono’s best early career vocals, has taken on a larger stature over the years due to it becoming a standout during live shows. Bono and company have performed the song at a variety of lengths more than 400 times.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

27. Bob Marley and the Wailers - 'Redemption Song'

There are many artists who would begin an album with “Redemption Song,” hoping to set the mood for what was to come. But Bob Marley was all about leaving a lasting impression, especially as he was already experiencing pain from cancer. “Redemption Song” contains all the power of Marley’s spirit as his life and career were nearing an end.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

26. Beach Boys - 'Caroline, No'

There are some people out there who will argue The Beach Boys saved the best for last on “Pet Sounds.” And that’s saying something. Essentially, “Caroline, No” is a Brian Wilson solo track. The song serves as a tearjerker standard many bands have tried to emulate with pretty much no one accomplishing such a feat.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

25. David Bowie - 'Rock 'n' Roll Suicide'

David Bowie knew how to tell a story, which was never more apparent than the finale in the story of Ziggy Stardust. “Rock ‘n’ Roll Suicide” is the song that brings one of rock’s greatest stories to a close. It’s a brilliant story of heartbreak and demise that’s somehow uplifting.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

24. LCD Soundsystem - 'New York, I Love You but You're Bringing Me Down'

Leave it to James Murphy to close out one of the greatest electronic/dance albums of all time with a heartbreaking ballad directed at the greatest city in the world. “New York, I Love You…” doesn’t have wild synths or drumbeats. But it remains the most impactful thing ever did with LCD Soundsystem.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

23. The Beatles - 'Tomorrow Never Knows'

The psychedelic opening and Ringo Starr’s drums are enough to get you hooked. “Revolver” is probably the Beatles best album because every track leaves you wanting more. That includes the ending with “Tomorrow Never Knows,” an inventive rock saga mixed brilliantly as John Lennon may or may not been losing his mind.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

22. Radiohead - 'Motion Picture Soundtrack'

“Motion Picture Soundtrack,” the mind-blowing closer from Radiohead’s “Kid A,” is the closest thing any modern day band has come to The Beatles “A Day In The Life.” Radiohead comes across like a group of kids in the candy store, combining a variety of whimsical sounds as Thom Yorke basically hums his way through a torrential odyssey.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

21. The Replacements - 'Here Comes a Regular'

Paul Westerberg was a hero or sorts for anyone who found themselves disenfranchised by mediocrity and disappointment during the 1980s. “Here Comes a Regular,” the closer from the The Replacements best album (“Tim”), captures that feeling as much as any song the band put out, documenting the life a man who finds shame during his frequent trips to the same sad sack bar.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

20. Nirvana - 'Something in the Way'

In listening to “Nevermind” for the first time, you’d think “Something in the Way” would eventually build towards a huge ending. The fact that it doesn’t is even more impressive. The greatest album of the 1990s ends with Cobain feeling lost, lonely, exhausted and, in many ways, at his most relatable.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

19. Public Enemy - 'Fight the Power'

Before Public Enemy’s third album, “Fear of a Black Planet,” came out, its closing track was already an anthem for the ages. “Fight the Power” was initially released as a single for Spike Lee’s “Do the Right Thing.” The slightly different version released with the album caps an important body of work in hip-hop culture. Public Enemy was always more of a movement than a rap group and “Fight the Power” drove that home.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

18. Guns N' Roses - 'Rocket Queen'

The final song on Guns N’ Roses’ “Appetite for Destruction” is a guitar driven burner that’s among one of the best heavy metal album closers of all-time. It’s also testament to how volatile the band was. As the story goes, Axl Rose wanted pornographic sounds on the track. So he brought a woman in to have sex with during the recording session. It was later revealed the woman was the girlfriend of drummer Steven Adler.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

17. Lynyrd Skynyrd - 'Free Bird'

It almost seems exhausting to talk about “Free Bird” at this point. The song has taken on a pop culture status so big, it’s easy to forget it closes out Lynyrd Skynyrd’s debut album in thrilling fashion. “Free Bird” became the finale at the band’s live shows as well, and became the go-to cover for hundreds of southern acts wishing to tackle it.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

16. Bob Dylan - 'Desolation Row'

“Desolation Row” may be Bob Dylan at his most lyrical. The closing song from “Highway 61 Revisited” references several characters from history over the course of 11 engaging minutes. It’s easy to forget just how ambitious such a closing song was in the mid-1960s, as “Desolation Row” further established Dylan as a songwriter unlike any other before or since.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

15. The Doors - 'The End'

When it comes to album closers, no song is more appropriately titled than The Doors’ 1967 classic. Jim Morrison and company evolved “The End” through relentless live performances, eventually stretching it to nearly 12 minutes. The psychedelic rock saga took on new life when a shorter version was featured in Francis Ford Coppola’s 1979 film “Apocalypse Now.”

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

14. Oasis - 'Champagne Supernova'

Say what you will about Oasis, but the 1990s British rockers did bombastic rock as well as anyone during the decade. They also knew how to go out in epic fashion. “Champagne Supernova,” the psychedelic closer to “(What’s the Story) Morning Glory)” clocks in at seven and a half minutes. But the song became such a fan favorite it was released as a shorter single that reached No.1 on Billboard’s Modern Rock Tracks chart.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

13. The Clash - 'Train in Vain'

“Train in Vain” wasn’t supposed to be included on The Clash’s masterpiece “London Calling.” It was such a last minute edition, the original pressings of the album didn’t include it on the tracklist. These days, it’s impossible to imagine “London Calling” without it’s perfect closer. It’s a love song for anyone whose been letdown over and over again, which is all of us.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

12. Led Zeppelin - 'When the Levee Breaks'

Oh those thunderous drums and bluesy guitars. “When the Levee Breaks” is a true force of nature that engulfs “Led Zeppelin IV” as much as it concludes it. The song is a hypnotic masterpiece on par with what the end of the word would sound like if we all went down in a fire of blues.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

11. Kanye West - 'Who Will Survive in America'

Kanye West’s “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy” isn’t just an album about an artist trying to find solid ground within his own mind, it’s about a man trying to find his place in the world. The closer, “Who Will Survive in America,” doesn’t even feature words from West. It’s an amazing track that samples Gil Scott-Heron’s “Comment No. 1,” a surrealist spoken-word about diminishing idealism. West chose wisely.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

10. Jimi Hendrix - 'Voodoo Child (Slight Return)'

The ending of the Jimi Hendrix Experience's "Electric Ladyland" is about as good as it gets. First there’s Hendrix’s cover (perhaps the greatest cover of all time) of Bob Dylan’s “All Along the Watchtower.” Then there’s the conclusion, “Voodoo Child (Slight Return),” which comes close you can musically to scorching the earth. Much of the song was improvised vocally and guitar wise by Hendrix, who developed the song from “Voodoo Chile,” building upon its unrelenting force and creating something unforgettable.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

9. Radiohead - 'Street Spirit (Fade Out)'

Perhaps no band in the history of music has as many great album closers as Radiohead. As many of five of them were considered for this list, including “OK Computer’s” “The Tourist,” which barely missed the cut. But “Street Spirit (Fade Out)” is truly Thom Yorke and company’s best conclusion. Not only is it the ending of a great album (“The Bends”). But “Street Spirit” stands on its own as one of the best tracks in Radiohead’s catalog, which is saying something.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

8. Pink Floyd - 'Eclipse'

Pink Floyd’s “Eclipse” both is and isn’t a closer. Yes, it rounds out “Dark Side of the Moon.” But it’s also a brilliant companion piece to “Brain Damage” and, more poignantly, an appropriate endnote on an album that so perfectly melds together. The fact that “Eclipse” doesn’t really stand on its own is what makes it one of the greatest album closers of all-time.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

7. The Rolling Stones - 'You Can't Always Get What You Want'

If “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” had ended after the first minute, it would probably still land this high on the list. The song, from “Let It Bleed,” is the Rolling Stones best closing track and plays as a perfect counterpart to the album’s opener “Gimme Shelter.” Call “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” controlled chaos that spirals into a frenetic finish, appropriate for one of the greatest albums of all time.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

6. The Who - 'Won't Get Fooled Again'

“Won’t Get Fooled Again” sounds like something far more complex than anything else on The Who’s “Who Next,” and it supposed to be. The track was originally intended for a rock opera Pete Townshend was working on, but was rightfully added to an album that also contains one of the best openers of all time (“Baba O’Riley”). “Won’t Get Fooled Again” has grown in stature over the past few decades thanks to its licensing to TV shows and various cover versions.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

5. Bruce Springsteen - 'Jungleland'

When you put put together an album as amazing as “Born to Run,” you might as well pull out all the stops for its finale. “Jungleland” famously opens with a 23 violin before morphing into a beautiful anthem that embodies the themes of “Born to Run.” Romance is pursued, dreams die and tragedy ensues. “Jungleland” also features what may be the greatest saxophone solo of the late Clarence Clemons’ career.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

4. Nine Inch Nails - 'Hurt'

Trent Reznor wasn’t messing around on Nine Inch Nails’ punishing second album, “The Downward Spiral.” It’s a brutal body of work with a closing track that begins, “I hurt myself today to see if I still feel.” It is, without question, a peak example of Reznor’s songwriting, as Johnny Cash proved by covering the anthem of despair in 2002. Reznor said the first time he heard Cash’s version, he was brought to tears. He wasn’t alone.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

3. Prince - 'Purple Rain'

If you’re looking to go out with an over-the-top extravaganza, there’s no outdoing the Purple One. Everything about “Purple Rain,” the movie and the album, was leading up to the title track, a soaring guitar-ballad for the ages. It’s the crowning achievement of a career in that it as perhaps the first time everyone knew Prince was as great as he thought he was.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

2. The Beatles - 'A Day in the Life'

For many people, the ending to "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" is the greatest album closer ever. The song, more than any other, emphasizes the dichotomy of The Beatles' chief songwriting figures. "A Day in the Life" takes on two different parts, as John Lennon and Paul McCartney wrote them independently. Lennon's opening utilizes an orchestral feel, while McCartney's closing morphs into a pop anthem. Alone, both are great. Together, they're flawless.

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Troy L. Smith, Northeast Ohio Media Group

1. Nirvana - 'All Apologies'

There is not doubt the stature of “In Utero’s” powerful closure was heightened by the doomed fate of writer. Kurt Cobain’s struggles with fame were so dire, in retrospect, it’s amazing Nirvana ever finished a third album in the first place. “All Apologies” had actually been around for a few years before the band put it on a “In Utero.” But it’s Cobain’s performance on the final studio version that stays with you. The final lyrics, “All in all is all we are” are both haunting and beautiful, forever attached to a musical legacy and tragedy.

Behind the Bar: Closing Time

Published 09/21/11. Legendary bar pro Dale DeGroff, aka "King Cocktail," is renowned for having sparked the modern cocktail renaissance while helming the bar program at the Rainbow Room in the 1980s and ’90s. The death of a neighborhood saloon is a traumatic event that hits its habitués as hard as the death of a loved one.

Legendary bar pro Dale DeGroff, aka "King Cocktail," is renowned for having sparked the modern cocktail renaissance while helming the bar program at the Rainbow Room in the 1980s and ’90s. 

The death of a neighborhood saloon is a traumatic event that hits its habitués as hard as the death of a loved one.

Several years ago, New York’s legendary East Side watering hole P.J. Clarke’s changed hands and shut down for renovations. I’d polished a barstool at P.J.’s since 1968, and at the closing party, bold with drink, I demanded from one of the new partners a vow that they wouldn’t mess up the joint. They didn’t, and when the doors reopened, all the thousands of regulars came back and hardly a photo was out of place. It was a rare happy ending.

A few years later and a bit further uptown, when the celebrity community that anchored Elaine’s came to pay its last respects to the establishment’s late owner, Elaine Kaufman, it knew the comfortable refuge could not survive. Hoping to keep the gang together, a former patron started a Facebook group called “All the People that You Knew at Elaine’s.” When longtime bartender Kevin Duffy worked a shift at Neary’s, it buzzed with anticipation, and its members gathered like survivors of a shipwreck.

I still mourn the loss of Paddy McGlade’s, my first New York neighborhood bar, which stood at the southwest corner of 67th Street and Columbus Avenue for more than 100 years. Then, one by one, the landlord closed the whole block of businesses. My revered watering hole is now a Starbucks.

The crowd that McGlade’s served was eclectic, including musicians and dancers from Lincoln Center, students from Juilliard and technicians who worked on soap operas across the street at ABC. In the 25 years I frequented the joint, there were only two lead bartenders: Al and Tim.

Al was elderly when I met him in 1969, a perfect gentleman who treated everyone with respect as long as they returned the favor. He would not tolerate profanity, and even the hard cases observed this dictum. When he was working, he was the boss, even though Paddy sat in the corner day and night. When Al made a call, it was final; Paddy would never think of overruling him. It took three years of faithful attendance before Paddy bought me a drink. (Of course, Al extended that courtesy much earlier in my tenure.)

When McGlade’s closed, it was given a proper Irish wake, and all the stock was poured for free until it was depleted. But the heart of the neighborhood had stopped beating, and the surviving family members were scattered across the city. There was no internet then, no lifeline.

Al was gone, and I lost track of Tim, until one day I needed directions and walked into a friendly looking Irish spot. There he was behind the bar, looking as uncomfortable as a substitute teacher. We hugged and reminisced over a couple beers. For the next year or so, I popped in once in a while, but it wasn’t the same. Tim eventually found a gig closer to home way uptown in the Bronx.

It was over, leaving a tear in my life that could never be repaired, but I still tell the stories.

The best end credit songs - amazing closing songs in movies

18-02-2022 · Song: Rage Against the Machine - Wake Up The Matrix has a streak of anger and nihilism throughout its run time so there was no better band to encapsulate that in song form. It's a double meta hit, too, with the name of the band being Rage Against The Machine and the song being Wake Up, both things Neo does throughout the film.

18-02-2022

Since the dawn of end credits, music has been used to end a movie. Sometimes that music is so powerful that not only does it contextualise the story that came before it, but lifts it on to a higher plane. For our money, that is exactly what the music on this best end credit songs list does.

The songs in the below list are all songs that existed before the movies they are in (except for Eminem's little ditty). Yet, they are now known because of the movies, such is the power of music and moving pictures.

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The best end credit songs

1. Fight Club

Song: Pixies - Where Is My Mind?

The ending of Fight Club goes like this (including spoilers, in case you’re one of the eight people who’s not seen it): Tyler works out that Tyler is Tyler. Tyler shoots self in head. Tyler says: “You met me at a very strange time in my life.” Banks explode. The Pixies’ Where Is My Mind? cranks into life and sums everything up. Audience goes ‘Whoah.’

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The best end credit songs

2. Stand By Me

Song: Ben E. King – Stand By Me

Though Stand By Me is based on Stephen King’s novella The Body, the film takes its name from the Ben E. King song. It’s a decision that enhances this classic, stirring tale of adventure, friendship and solidarity.

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The best end credit songs

3. 8 Mile

Song: Lose Yourself - Eminem

The whole of 8 Mile was building up to its ending, when B-Rabbit has a rap battle that, if he wins, hip-hop supremacy awaits. As 8 Mile is loosely based on the life of Eminem it was always right that the rap god would create an absolute banger of a track to end the movie that sums up the passion of someone who, to seize everything he ever wanted, only has one shot.

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The best end credit songs

4. The Matrix

Song: Rage Against the Machine - Wake Up

The Matrix has a streak of anger and nihilism throughout its run time so there was no better band to encapsulate that in song form. It's a double meta hit, too, with the name of the band being Rage Against The Machine and the song being Wake Up, both things Neo does throughout the film.

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The best end credit songs

5. The Bourne Ultimatum

Song: Moby – Extreme Ways

For most sensible people, the end of the third Bourne film comes as a musical epiphany. Instead of being a guy who makes dreary music for adverts, it turns out that Moby's music is occasionally amazing. Who knew?

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The best end credit songs

6. Donnie Darko

Song: Gary Jules - Mad World

Just what was it that happened in Donnie Darko? Does anyone know? At the very least, Gary Jules’ plaintive cover of Tears For Fears’ classic Mad World went some way to reflecting the mind-jumble experienced by the audience. A mad world, indeed.

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The best end credit songs

7. Ferris Bueller’s Day Off

Song: Yello – Oh Yeah

The synergy of a youthful Matthew Broderick doling out a carefree life mantra and a synthesised voice growling “Oh Yeah” will probably never be bettered in cinema. Bravo.

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The best end credit songs

8. The Graduate

Song: The Sound Of Silence - Simon & Garfunkel

It's the third time we hear The Sound Of Silence in The Graduate, but it's certainly the most poignant. After the high of breaking off her wedding to run away with the man/boy she loves, Ben and Mrs Robinson end up on the back of a bus. Free from their old lives, their smiles soon change to something else. Fear? Terror? Sadness? Whatever it is, The Sound Of Silence is the perfect sombre soundtrack.

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The best end credit songs

9. Deadpool

Song: George Michael - Careless Whisper

There's no better song to have over a scene where a streaky bacon faced Wade Wilson kisses the love of his life than Careless Whisper. Even Deadpool's commentary of, "well that's the only thing pulling out tonight" doesn't ruin the romance in this brilliant ending.

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The best end credit songs

10. Dr. Strangelove

Song: Vera Lynn – We’ll Meet Again

The shot of Slim Pickens riding a nuclear bomb to the end of the world is such a memorable one, but it's made infinitely better with Vera Lynn's song in the background, a song that was written to gee up the English troops in World War II. This is such a fantastic final moment in not just this movie but any movie.

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The best end credit songs

11. Trainspotting

Song: Underworld - Born Slippy

Underworld’s Born Slippy is the perfect choice for the end of this Danny Boyle classic. As Renton (Ewan MacGregor) commits the ultimate betrayal of his friends to save himself, the song provides the backdrop for his ‘Choose Life’ mantra. A culturally iconic moment of the ’90s.

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The best end credit songs

12. Reservoir Dogs

Song: Nilsson – Coconut

You can’t do a list of great music in films without mentioning Tarantino. His first two movies in particular, Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction, harvest gems from the ‘70s. Harry Nilsson’s whimsical, single-chord Coconut is the perfect contrast to Reservoir Dogs’ tense and bloody final scene.

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The best end credit songs

13. Goodfellas

Song: Sid Vicious – My Way

Not long after Ray Liotta’s stopped freaking out to imaginary helicopters and the piano bit from Derek & The Dominoes’ epic Layla, he winds up in court. Next comes the punk rock manifesto of Sid Vicious’s My Way. Joe Pesci doesn’t seem to find any of it very funny.

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The best end credit songs

14. Platoon/The Elephant Man

Song: Samuel Barber - Adagio For Strings

Samuel Barber's Adagio For Strings is the sort of thing you pop on the iPod for your commute (unless you’re heading into a particularly heavy-duty meeting that morning), but a moving piece of modern classical music, nonetheless. Written in 1936, it has appeared in many films and computer games – most notably deployed at the end of David Lynch’s The Elephant Man and Oliver Stone’s Platoon to yank hard at the heartstrings.

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The best end credit songs

15. Groundhog Day

Song: Nat King Cole – Almost Like Being In Love

Forget Sonny and Cher’s I Got You, Babe – the most uplifting bit in this existential classic is delivered by Nat King Cole. When today finally becomes tomorrow, weatherman Phil Connors (Bill Murray) heads outside with his new love, Rita (Andie MacDowell), to the joyous sound of Almost Like Being In Love. Finally, he’s ready to get on with the rest of his life.

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The best end credit songs

16. The Big Lebowski

Song: Townes Van Zandt – Dead Flowers (Rolling Stones cover)

Allegedly, the Stones’ manager Allen Klein was holding out for 0,000 for the rights to use this song at the end of The Big Lebowski. However, when he heard The Dude utter the immortal line “I hate the fuckin’ Eagles, man” he was so delighted that he let the Cohen brothers have it for free. The version used on the film is by cult musician Townes Van Zandt, from his album Roadsongs.

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The best end credit songs

17. Romeo Juliet

Radiohead – Exit Music (For A Film)

Though it appears at the end of Romeo Juliet, this song didn’t appear on the OST. Instead, it was held over for Radiohead’s 1997 classic OK Computer. It’s pretty bleak stuff, which suits the story’s double-suicide, emo-supernovae ending. (If that last sentence was a spoiler we can deduce that you failed your English GCSE.)

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The best end credit songs

18. Rushmore

Song: Faces – Ooh La La

Wes Anderson’s films use a lot of good music, thanks to the input of DEVO legend Mark Mothersbaugh. For the ending of his second movie, the gloriously silly Rushmore, the pair selected the Faces’ Ooh La La. It’s a great choice, especially the timing of the line, “I wish that I knew what I know now/When I was younger”, as the curtains close on Max Fischer and Rosemary Cross sharing a dance.

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The best end credit songs

19. Good Will Hunting

Song: Elliott Smith – Miss Misery

This moving song brought the music of Elliott Smith to much wider attention when it received an Oscar nomination in 1998. Thought it lost out to the schmaltz-fest of Titanic and Celine Dion’s My Heart Will Go On, Smith performed at the ceremony. Arguably, the singer never fully came to terms with his newfound fame. He died in 2003 aged 34.

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The best end credit songs

20. Jerry Maguire

Song: Bob Dylan - Shelter From The Storm

No record collection – WE SAY NONE – should be without Dylan’s 1975 opus Blood On The Tracks. This refrain is the most pertinent to the film: "Come in," she said, "I'll give you shelter from the storm"” In tandem with the sign-off from Dicky Fox (Jerry’s mentor in the movie) the message here is to get your home life straight and the rest will follow.


The best movie soundtracks, revealed.